Recology

Artist in Residence Program Announces 2015 Residency Recipients

Posted in Diversion, Recycling, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on December 9, 2014

Recology San Francisco is pleased to announce recipients of artist residencies for 2015. The six selected artists are Michael Arcega, Jeremiah Barber, Ma Li, Jenny Odell, Alison Pebworth, and Chris Sollars.

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco is a one-of-a-kind initiative started in 1990 to support Bay Area artists, while also teaching children and adults about recycling and resource conservation. Artists work for four months in a studio on site and use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

http://www.recologysf.com/AIR


Michael Arcega and Ma Li
Residency: February-May; Exhibition reception: May 22 and 23, 2015

As an interdisciplinary artist, Michael Arcega works across media to create art that is informed by language, history, and geography. In his most recent work he has adopted methodologies used in the anthropological study of world cultures that often emphasize “otherness,” but Arcega turns the tables, positioning North America as ‘the other” whose symbols and rituals must be studied and understood. Though a socio-political critique, Arcega’s work also has a playful element, providing familiar entry points to alternative ways of thinking about the people who colonize the landscape. Arcega is an Assistant Professor of Art at San Francisco State University. He received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. In 2012, he was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. His work has been exhibited at the Asia Society in New York, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Honolulu Academy of Art, and the Orange Country Museum of Art in Newport Beach.
Ma Li uses non-traditional art media and discarded materials to create sculpture and installations. Her dream-like, large-scale, frequently suspended forms reference her Chinese heritage and often appear like temples, lanterns, or ceremonial architecture. But titles of works, such as Retrofuture City and 633 Hours to Intergalactica!, in combination with her materials that include vividly-colored plastics, lights, and mylar, speak to the meeting of tradition and pop culture; the ordinary and the fantastic; and the hand-made and mass-produced. She describes her works as “imbued with a sense of a celebration and a reminiscence of identity: from a woman in a collective society to a citizen of the planet.” Ma received an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and a BS in Chemical Engineering from Shanghai Dong Hua University. In 2014, she was the recipient of a Pollack-Krasner Foundation Fellowship. She is also the recipient of a Murphy and Cadogan Contemporary Art Award and a Knight Foundation Finalist Grant. She has exhibited at SOMArts, Root Division, and Swell Gallery in San Francisco, and has been an artist in residence at the Elsewhere Museum in Greensboro, North Carolina and the Vermont Studio Center.

Jenny Odell and Chris Sollars
Residency: June-September; Exhibition reception: September 18 and 19, 2015

Jenny Odell uses found imagery from sources such as Google Maps to create “portraits” of systems ranging from waste-water treatment plants to popular web searches. She has located satellite images of the factories world-wide where all the items she wore, ate or bought over the course of one day were produced, and has gathered aerial photos of 97 nuclear cooling towers together in a single image that is as aesthetically pleasing as it is disturbingly fascinating. Her work makes visible infrastructures and sources of production that play a role in our daily lives, but which are often hidden. She describes herself as “not so much a photographer as a collector.” Odell received an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and a BA from the University of California at Berkeley. She is the recipient of a San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist Grant, and has exhibited at Intersection for the Arts, White Walls, and SOMArts in San Francisco, and in New York, Paris, and Barcelona. Her work has been featured in The EconomistWIREDFrieze, and The Atlantic.
Chris Sollars’ art involves the reclamation and subversion of public space through interventions and performance. His work can be experienced in two ways—through the witnessing of, or participation in, a performative event, or later viewing the documentation of the event in a gallery context via installations that combine photography, video, and sculpture. Sollars’ process is physical and conceptual as he juxtaposes dissimilar elements to create unexpected forms that are often comedic. Sollars received an MFA from Bard College and a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2013, he was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has received a San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist Commission Grant, a Eureka Fellowship Award, Artadia Grant, Headlands Center for the Arts Residency, and has exhibited in venues nationally and internationally. His work is in the permanent collection of the Berkeley Art Museum and his Left Behind sculpture series was most recently published by Publication Studio in 2013.

Jeremiah Barber and Alison Pebworth
Residency: October-January; Exhibition reception: January 22 and 23, 2016

Working in performance, video, sculpture, and installation, Jeremiah Barber explores ideas of transcendence, as well as perseverance, memory, and personal mythologies. Using his own body in performances that have incorporated elements such as fire, water and smoke, Barber investigates the realms of both the physical and the metaphysical. Though elegantly minimal in their execution, his attempts at near-impossible actions also include humor and illuminate the absurdity and wonder at the core of what it means to be human. Barber received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from Columbia College in Chicago. He is the recipient of a Eureka Fellowship, a San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist Grant, and from 2005-07 was an exhibiting member of Marina Abramovic’s independent performance group. He has exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and in the Bay Area at Southern Exposure, SOMArts, the Headlands Center for the Arts, and The Lab.
Alison Pebworth explores aspects of contemporary life and culture using the tropes and traditions of an earlier America through projects such as her Beautiful Possibility tour in which she traveled to 25 venues across the United States and Canada. Her work is equal parts social practice, public performance, and fine art exhibition, and harkens back to a time of traveling performers and sideshow curiosities. Pebworth’s projects are often long-range and involve the gathering of data to bring to light the ailments of our sped up, high tech world, for which she provides metaphorical (and sometimes actual) elixirs. Pebworth is the recipient of Artist Grants from the San Francisco Arts Commission and the Center for Cultural Innovation and has been an artist-in-residence at numerous institutions including Ucross Foundation, Claremont, WY and the de Young Museum. She has exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Detroit, the Salt Lake Art Center, in Salt Lake City, and in the Bay Area at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Southern Exposure and Headlands Center for the Arts. Her work is included in Rebecca Solnit’s Infinite City.

Recology – Artist in Residence Program – Issue No. 11

Posted in Community, Diversion, Recology, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on November 12, 2014

Current Resident Artists

Kara Maria and Imin Yeh have hit the ground running, adapting to scavenging while also being incredibly productive. Within the first two weeks of their residencies Kara had nine paintings simultaneously in progress and Imin had created an entire alphabet of hand-carved movable type. Kara is experimenting with mark-making with found objects and plans on including representations of the wide range of animals at the facility—from hawks to flies—in her paintings. Imin has been carving wood printing blocks based on original artwork she’s found, and is also working on a quilt from discarded uniforms. Student artist Matthew Goldberg is collecting items that were once considered futuristic in order to explore our relationship to outer space. He’s been thinking about what might happen if we were to send our trash out into the galaxy—an idea some people have actually proposed. We’re excited to see what Kara, Imin, and Matthew will make in the coming months. Their end of residency exhibition will take place January 23, 24 and 27.

Beehive Cob Oven Gets a Second Life

After the Hayes Valley Farm closed in June 2013, we were the fortunate recipients of its cob oven. Though it took some time to build a new base and reinstall the oven, we completed the project in time for our last exhibition reception. Shaped like a beehive, the oven is now in the vegetable garden behind the art studio. During the Saturday reception we cooked pizzas in the oven for the public, topped with vegetables harvested from our garden.

The cob oven was built by Miguel Elliott of Living Earth Structures and participants of the Hayes Valley Farm’s permaculture course in May, 2012. The farm was a volunteer-led community project almost a city-block in size, located on the site of a former freeway onramp at Laguna Street between Fell and Oak Streets in San Francisco. The farm existed for three years through an interim use agreement with the City. Today condominiums are being built on the land. We are honored to have the oven here and keep the spirit of Hayes Valley Farm alive.  For more information about the Farm and the other urban agriculture projects it has inspired, visit hayesvalleyfarm.tumblr.com.

Selection of New Artists

We are currently in the process of selecting artists for 2015 residencies and will announce residency recipients in early December. If you are interested in applying for a 2016 residency, we will begin taking applications in late spring. The application deadline will be August 31, 2015. For more information about how to apply, please visit recology.com/AIR.

 

Like Us on Facebook

If you’ve liked the Recology Artist in Residence Program on Facebook, but aren’t seeing our posts, make sure to select “get notifications.” If you haven’t liked us already, you should!
facebook.com/recologyartatthedump

Exhibitions

Work from the Recology Artist in Residence Program was recently exhibited at 2 Blocks of Art, an annual art walk on 6th Street in San Francisco. From January 5 to March 4 work will be exhibited in the lobby of 350/400 California Street, and from March 10 to 22 there will be an exhibition of Recology artwork in Los Angeles at the Voila Gallery at 518 N. LaBrea Avenue.

Gardener in Residence

In 2015, we will begin a Gardener in Residence Program, organized with the guidance of Garden for the Environment. Gardeners will have access to the Recology Sculpture Garden for projects and will work on site for four months. Information regarding the program will be posted on our website in December.

 

Alumni News

Re:New, an exhibition curated by Nemo Gould and Jeff Hantman and featuring new artwork by former Recology resident artists, is up at Lost and Foundry Oakland. Artists in the exhibition are Micah Gibson, Nemo Gould, Barbara Holmes, Ferris Plock, Lauren DiCioccio, Jeff Hantman, Benjamin Cowden, Yulia Pinkusevich, and Hannah Quinn. The exhibition will be on view through November 22, by appointment only.

James Sansing is the recipient of a 2014/15 Pollock Krasner Grant for painting. His film Verses is included in the Biennial of the Moving Image (BIM) in Buenos Aires in November, and he has been commissioned by Christian Dior to create three paintings for their Soho location in New York.

Lauren DiCioccio’s recent solo exhibition at Jack Fischer Gallery was reviewed by Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle.She is currently an affiliate artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts.

Work by Jeff Hantman is included in the 28th Annual Emeryville Art Exhibition. The show runs through November 2, and is open daily, 11am-6pm. He is also in an exhibition at The Compound Gallery, opening November 1, and will have several works on exhibition in the space’s new Fabrefaction Gallery.

Work by Stephanie Syjuco is included in the Alien She exhibition at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, on view until January 25. She is also currently at the Workshop Residence where she is developing a collection of garments featuring a non-repeating dazzle screen print inspired by the camouflage systems used on WWI battleships.

Jeremy Rourke will be screening and performing with his stop-motion collage videos at Shapeshifters Cinema in Oakland on November 16. He will be showing a number of works, including the videos he made during his Recology residency.

Sirron Norris, Val Britton, and current Recology artists-in-residence Kara Maria and Imin Yeh all participated in the October 26Passport event, an annual art walk sponsored by the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery.

Karrie Hovey is spending October at the Brush Creek Artist Residency in Saratoga, Wyoming. She is also an affiliate artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and will be exhibiting in the Shunpike Storefronts program in Seattle which enables artists to exhibit their work in vacant storefronts. Her work will be on display on Republican Street in Seattle from November to March.

Samuel Levi Jones is the recipient of the Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize given by the Studio Museum in Harlem. The $50,000 prize is awarded each year to one artist “who demonstrates great innovation, promise, and creativity.” Previous recipients include Gary Simmons, Glenn Ligon, and Lorna Simpson. He also has a solo show, Black White Thread, opening November 8 at Papillion in Los Angeles.

Reddy Lieb will teach glass workshops on November 9 and December 7, 10am-4pm, and a mini workshop on November 30, 1-3pm. Workshops are held at 3535 19th Street. For more information, fees, or to register, please contact Reddy.

Nemo Gould appears in Maker, a documentary on the maker movement.

Michael Kerbow was awarded a grand prize for his painting Critical Mass in the juried show Real Surreal at Sandra Lee Gallery in San Francisco. As part of the award he will be given an exhibition at the gallery in 2015.

Colette Crutcher has completed another mosaic stair project in collaboration with Aileen Barr, the Arelious Walker Stairway in Hunters Point off of Innes Street near the shipyard. She is also working on a grouping of mosaic-clad sculptures that will be installed at Taraval Street and 48th Avenue in early 2015.

Yulia Pinkusevich was selected to create a sculptural seating centerpiece for the new McMurtry Art and Art History building, designed by Diller, Scofidio & Renfro, at Stanford University.

Julia Goodman will teach a tin can papermaking workshop at INTUIT: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art in Chicago on November 22. Her recent beet papyrus work The Root of Scarcity, 2014 will be included in Rooted in Soil, a group exhibition at the DePaul Art Museum, January 29 to April 26, 2015.

Bill Russell will show a series of new abstract paintings in a group show November 15, 16, 22 and 23 from 10am-4pm at ArtBrokers Gallery, 425 Irwin Street, San Rafael.

Mike Kendall will participate in Benicia open studios the first weekend of December. For more information:http://mikekendall.com/.

Paula Pereira, working collaboratively with Swedish artist Pernilla Andersson as t.w.five, will have an installation in the Luggage Store’s new Lower Haight exhibition space. Entitled, Automaton X, the exhibition will open November 15, with a reception at 7pm.Luggage Store Projects @ 457 Haight.

Christine Lee will be an artist-in-residence at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Colorado in February.

Scott Kildall is finishing up a residency at Impact Works in Utrecht in the Netherlands. During the residency he has made a new online art project called EquityBot, a stock-trading algorithm that “invests” in emotions such as anger, joy, disgust and amazement. During stock market hours, EquityBot tracks sentiments on Twitter to gauge how the world is feeling and links these emotions with actual stocks to make investments using a simulated brokerage account.

Kristin Cammermeyer was a recent visiting artist at UC Davis. Mid-May through June she will be producing new work at The Hedreen Gallery at Seattle University in Washington.

Ethan Estess is currently at the Nautilus Lanzarote art residency in the Canary Islands, using materials he finds on the beaches and streets to tell stories about the island’s people and environment. His collage series, Marine Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, will be exhibited at the Pacific Grove Art Center, opening January 9. He began the series when he stumbled upon a 1970s whale poster in the dump during his Recology residency.

Matthew Gottschalk is an artist-in-residence in the Jail Cell studio at Alter Space in San Francisco. His solo show there, This Is Where Home Is, opens December 6th. He will also have an installation, The Higher We Rise, The Further Away I Seem,  in the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery’s Grove Street Windows opening December 16 with an artist talk January 10.

Scott Oliver’s proposal for a public artwork at the corner of Masonic Ave. and Geary Blvd. was chosen by the SF Arts Commission. Entitled Points of Departure, it will be fabricated by San Francisco-based Gizmo Art Production and is expected to be installed in spring, 2016.

Susan Leibovitz Steinman has published the latest edition of the online WEAD Magazine, Issue No. 7 “Cultivating Communities.”

Recology San Francisco Artist in Residence Exhibitions: Work by Matthew Gottschalk, Jamil Hellu and Claire Lynch

Posted in Community, Diversion, Events, Resource Recovery, San Francisco by art at the dump on May 2, 2014

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Matthew Gottschalk, Jamil Hellu, and student artist Claire Lynch on Friday, May 23, from 5-9pm and Saturday, May 24, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, May 27, from 5-7pm, followed by a gallery walk-through with the artists at 7pm. This exhibition will be the culmination of four months of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.

Matthew Gottschalk: From the Belly of the Whale
Matthew Gottschalk has looked to explorers such as Jacques Cousteau and Carl Sagan for inspiration while on his own epic adventure at the dump. Gottschalk, who in the past has used marionette puppets as protagonists in installations that include sculpture and video components, has crafted a Carl Sagan puppet to explore the cosmos of the Recology facility. Through the use of touchstones of popular culture—and an ever-engaging marionette—Gottschalk brings playfulness to deeper questions of what it means to be human.

Work alludes to Joseph Campbell’s concepts of the “hero’s journey” and universal myths, as well as to the primal human need to bring order and meaning to the world around us through such stories. Gottschalk also references the dangers and mysteries of space and oceanographic exploration; his series of harpoons made from materials including baseball bats and fireplace pokers suggest conquest and being “in the belly of the whale”—both literally and metaphorically—connecting to his own process of hunting for materials in the Public Disposal and Recycling Area. Much like the real Carl Sagan’s “Golden Record,” a collection of audio recordings and photographs representing aspects of life on earth sent into space with the hope that it might one day be found, Gottschalk’s marionette Carl Sagan has collected the evidence of life on earth through its detritus so that we may better know ourselves. Gottschalk will also create a soundtrack for the journey played on revived and newly created musical instruments.

Gottschalk holds an MFA from Mills College, a BA in studio art from the University of California at Davis, and has studied at Yale. He was the recipient of a fellowship at Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany, and he has exhibited his artwork and videos in Nevada City, California; Stuttgart and Kassel, Germany; Gaza, Palestine; and Rijeka, Croatia.


Jamil Hellu: Portraits
The images photographer Jamil Hellu has made during his Recology residency explore a range of ideas related to identity and portraiture. Examining how we create and negotiate our identities throughout our lives, Hellu looks at our memories via objects, and contemplates the pivotal influences that shape who we are. The work questions the shifting nature of identity and the many roles we play in our personal and professional lives. In some cases, Hellu places the things he has photographed alongside their images and brings poignancy to mundane yet once cherished items. He also replicates scenes in found photographs that are simultaneously humorous and touching, pointing to commonalities between seemingly different people.

Work also explores identity in crisis and what it means to dispose of key markers of identity in a place like the public dump. If throwing away things, especially photographs, is a metaphor for the loss of individual identity, then the dump pile, becomes a homogenous monument to general human experience. Illustrating this is Hellu’s shredded pile of one-hundred snapshots of people at the Golden Gate Bridge—both a permanent erasure of these specific memories and an evocation of the universal significance this destination holds in people’s lives. Other photographs expand on this Bay Area and California love, as well as a love of photography itself.

Born in Brazil, Hellu received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. He has been a recipient of a Graduate Student Fellowship from the Headlands Center for the Arts and received a residency at Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His recent series of photographs, Guardians of the Golden Gate, which capture friends in superhero guises of their own choosing in locations around the Bay Area, has been the subject of national media coverage.

"/
Claire Lynch: Befriending Demons
In a series of large-scale, abstract, sculptural bird forms, Claire Lynch explores difficult human emotions and how we negotiate and deal with these feelings. Of particular interest to Lynch are feelings such as tension, anger, or discomfort—emotions universally experienced, yet often condemned as socially unacceptable to express. Lynch explores the role these emotions have in shaping who we are, and how sometimes the things that are the most difficult to navigate provide space for the greatest growth. Four sculptures each address different responses to these emotions and represent concealment, routine, balance, and embrace. Together they point to the need to acknowledge and understand the place these feelings have in our lives.

Claire Lynch will receive her BA in studio art from Stanford University this June. She has taught art at the American Overseas School of Rome Summer Program in Italy, and at the Potomac School Summer Program in McLean, Virginia. While a student at Stanford, Lynch has worked as an assistant at the Stanford University Art Gallery, and as a fabricator.


About the Recology Artist in Residence Program

Since 1990, the Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco has encouraged the conservation of natural resources while instilling a greater appreciation for art and the environment in children and adults. This one-of-a-kind program enables artists to work in studio space on site for four months, use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, and speak to students and the general public about reuse and their residency experiences. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

When:
Reception- Friday, May 23, 2014, 5-9pm
Reception-Saturday, May 24, 2014, 1-3pm
Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 5-7pm with gallery walk-through with artists at 7pm

Where:
Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible. http://www.recologysf.com/AIR

Upcoming Artist in Residence Program Exhibition at Recology San Francisco

Posted in Community, Diversion, Events, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on January 6, 2014

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Yulia Pinkusevich, Stephanie Syjuco, and student artist Brittany Watkins on Friday, January 24, from 5-9pm and Saturday, January 25, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, January 28, from 5-7pm. An artist panel discussion will follow at 7pm at 401 Tunnel Avenue. This exhibition will be the culmination of four months of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.


Yulia Pinkusevich: The Glory of a Tool is Seldom Judged by Its Handle

An important part of Yulia Pinkusevich’s practice involves the creation of large-scale monochromic paintings and drawings, often made directly on walls that engage with architecture and play with spatial perception. While at Recology she has continued this practice, but has also “drawn” with the duality of light and shadow, constructing projection boxes that contain objects that cast images on the walls of the studio’s back room. The results are visually complex cityscapes—large darkened outlines of high-rises and other familiar urban forms. While it is obvious this is a city, exactly what city this might be is less clear, as the architecture seems a cross between the futuristic and the familiar. It is no wonder that these forms are a bit enigmatic; they are created using capacitors and heat sinks pulled from common electronic devises—devices we interact with every day, but whose working components are far less familiar.

Pinkusevich examines the role of architecture in our daily lives and how it frames, transects, and obscures the world around us, affecting our spatial perception and cognitive understanding. Her use of components from computers and televisions—technologies that also shape our perception of the world—is an apt metaphor. Her work also addresses broader issues related to global urbanization and labor. The fabrication of electronics and other consumer goods increasingly has societal and environmental consequences when formerly rural areas become sites of rapidly built factories and worker housing. The long-term impact this instant architecture will have is only beginning to be understood. Pinkusevich’s working process also provided a more direct connection to labor. She discovered that there was a specific order to disassembling the electronics and realized that she was actually reversing the process of the people who put these components together. Other sculptural works speak to this more personal view of labor and tie what is built to the anonymous builders, people whose labor—whether used for the construction of an apartment block or a pair of jeans—is increasingly taken for granted along with the resources used to fuel our disposable lifestyles.

Born and raised in the Ukraine, Pinkusevich holds a BFA from Rutgers University and an MFA from Stanford University. She has been the recipient of a Headlands Center for the Arts Graduate Fellowship in Sausalito, a Cite Des Arts International Studio Residency in Paris, and a Helen Wurlitzer Foundation Residency Grant in Taos, New Mexico. She has exhibited primarily in San Francisco, New York and Santa Fe and her work is in the collection of Google, Inc. and the city of Albuquerque.


Stephanie Syjuco: Modern Ruins (Popular Cannibals)

For Modern Ruins (Popular Cannibals), Stephanie Syjuco takes beloved archetypes of modernist furniture and reproduces them dump-style to explore a range of ideas related to production, consumption, class, and economies. Continuing her investigation of copies and counterfeits, her George Nelson tables and Verner Panton lamps speak to how today’s reproductions are generations removed from their furniture forbearers. These iconic objects have been knocked-off or borrowed from so often that many people may think they originated at Ikea or Crate and Barrel. By exploring these forms, questions arise as to the original intent behind the designs and their meaning in today’s world where the clean lines of modern furniture often serve as signifiers of an affluent, idealized lifestyle.

Using what she describes as a “shanty-like” aesthetic, Syjuco’s reproductions are certainly not meant to fool anyone or be functional. Instead, they bring the sleek, modern ideal into collision with the scavenged and cobbled-together through the immediate use of materials in rudimentary constructions. The works speak to the shoddy materials and cheap labor used to produce affordable contemporary modern furniture, and like the remnants of a dying civilization, suggest societal and environmental collapse. Calling on her own memories of the Philippines where International Style buildings stood alongside slums and shanties, Syjuco’s work also references Modernism’s long and complicated relationship to developing countries—how decades ago these new urban spaces adapted and formed their own versions of Modernist architecture which in many cases are now dilapidated signs of the promise of utopian progress.

Syjuco is an assistant professor in Sculpture at the University of California at Berkeley. Her work is in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. She received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and has exhibited internationally including at venues in Paris, Manila, Berlin, and Bangkok. She is represented by Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco.

"/
Brittany Watkins: The Time Objects Tell
During her residency, Brittany Watkins has collected objects such as window blinds, wire and inner tubes, and has shredded, knotted, woven and bent them to create abstract sculptural works. By dramatically altering their forms, Watkins has liberated these common items from their intended uses and explores their hidden potential. Watkins’ repetitive and time-intensive working process provides intimacy with the materials, and the resulting sculptures speak to connections between the inanimate and the animate. Suggestive of natural or biological forms, her works may also prompt viewers to assign more personal, human qualities to these objects.

For her exhibition, Watkins will present a large-scale sculpture as the centerpiece of an installation that will include other smaller, related works. Designed to be entered, this central piece will enable viewers to step inside, be engulfed by the materials, and have the same sort of personal experience with them that the artist did when making the work. Those that enter will also be confronted with their own physicality within a space that itself references the body. The other small pieces that compose this sculptural ecosystem serve to illustrate the versatility and mutability of the materials. They are grounded, but also loop, drape, and expand out, adapting as required to unseen forces.

Watkins is a graduate student at the California College of the Arts. She received her BFA from Montana State University with an emphasis in sculpture. She has exhibited at the Center on Contemporary Art in Seattle, the International Sculpture Center Temporary Space in Chicago, and the IEI Austin Gallery in Texas. Her work was published in the October 2011 issue of International Sculpture.


About the Recology Artist in Residence Program

Since 1990, the Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco has encouraged the conservation of natural resources while instilling a greater appreciation for art and the environment in children and adults. This one-of-a-kind program enables artists to work in studio space on site for four months, use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, and speak to students and the general public about reuse and their residency experiences. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

When:
Reception- Friday, January 24, 2014, 5-9pm
Reception-Saturday, January 25, 2014, 1-3pm
Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 5-7pm
Artist panel discussion- Tuesday, January 28, 7pm

Where: Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible. http://www.recologysf.com/AIR

Recology San Mateo County cleans up the Bayfront

Posted in Events, Recology, San Mateo County by art at the dump on October 11, 2013

Our Recology San Mateo County volunteers participated in the 29th Annual San Mateo Bayfront Clean Up. Volunteers picked up litter along the Bayfront Trail, San Mateo Creek, Marina Lagoon and Tidelines Park. Most of the materials found were cigarette butts, food wrappers, plastic bags, and plastic water bottles. There were also some very interesting finds in our bay… tires, shopping carts, chairs, and even toys!

“The clean up was a great bonding time with the family and a gratifying experience to be able to help in keeping the environment clean.”

- Sheila, Recology San Mateo County employee-owner

null

null

null

Join us at the California Coastal Cleanup

Posted in Events, Recology, You Should Know... by art at the dump on October 11, 2013

Saturday, September 21

9AM – noon

 Are you looking for something to do tomorrow? Join us for the Coastal Cleanup tomorrow morning.

Check out the links below to register and participate! 

Event Registration, Materials & Resources          

http://www.parksconservancy.org/events/volunteer-events/special-events/california-coastal-cleanup.html

  • Includes information on:     
    • Sites
    • 2012 stats & more about Coastal Cleanup Day
    • Sponsors & Site Captains
    • Downloadable Posters & Waiver Forms

Want to coordinate a team? Visit CCC: www.coastforyou.org

 Recology & iMRF: http://www.recologysf.com
 

Get up to speed on the reasons to participate:

Upcoming Artist in Residence Program Exhibition at Recology San Francisco

Posted in Diversion, Events, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on September 5, 2013

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Kristin Cammermeyer and Chad Hasegawa, and visiting artists Claudel Casseus, Romel Jean Pierre, and Racine Polycarpe on Friday, September 20, from 5-9pm and Saturday, September 21, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, September 24, from 5-7pm. An artist panel discussion will follow at 7pm at 401 Tunnel Avenue. This exhibition will be the culmination of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.

Kristin Cammermeyer: DOUBLE HOW in & out the Back Room

When first looking at Kristin Cammermeyer ’s large-scale installation in the backroom of the Recology Art Studio, one might not immediately see a connection to her background as a painter. But it soon becomes apparent that she manipulates line, color, and perspective to alter perception, much as a painter does to convey three-dimensionality in 2-D. Cammermeyer uses these effects to create a sense of disorientation, which she likens to the surreal environment of the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, where she scavenged for materials. Viewers can succumb to the manipulation of lights, mirrors, and other objects placed in groupings throughout the space that appear like abstract still-lifes, framed by the lumber that is the infrastructure for the installation. Though carefully composed by the artist, the arrangements speak to the random meeting of materials at the Recology site which Cammermeyer has described as, “the arbitrary, yet seemingly composed moments that can occur at the fringes…instances of incidental formalism that suggest a collective consciousness and elegant design in a seemingly haphazard world.”

Site-specific in nature, Cammermeyer’s installation mirrors the framework and trusses of the building’s architecture which she sees as another found material with which to work. Cammermeyer has placed raw materials at the top of the installation, with the materials becoming more refined as they move down through the piece, drawing connections between the artistic process, the dump, and human digestion, in their shared processing of materials through labor. The constant movement of materials at the Recology facility is mimicked in the life-cycle of the installation, documented in her time-lapse video. The video provides a flattened, framed format through which one can experience the changing work. The precision of her construction and the vision behind it becomes even more apparent in this context as lines, shapes, and objects strategically envelop the video screen. Cammermeyer will also embed small mixed-media pieces within the installation and is working on a series of owl boxes for the sculpture garden.

Chad Hasegawa: Os Pukas

A constant in Chad Hasegawa’s paintings, sculptures, and murals is his iconic grizzly bear. Traditionally symbolic of strength and courage, in Hasegawa’s works the bear’s meaning is expanded to personify a range of qualities. Sometimes self-referential and sometimes representing the artist’s family or friends, Hasegawa’s bears offer the opportunity for anyone to see themselves in his depictions of strength, protectiveness, vulnerability, solitariness, and fierceness. During his residency, Hasegawa’s grizzly bear has explored the terrain of the dump. Paintings, sculpture, and an installation by Hasegawa position the bear as scavenger and survivor trying to make a home amidst the cast-off debris, and speak to the collision of nature and civilization. By positioning the bear at the dump, associations can be made regarding how our trash ultimately impacts the natural environment and the animals who reside there, but Hasegawa’s work speaks more broadly to ideas of the human/animal relationship. His bears inspire a sense of reverence, and suggest a more mystical or unexplainable connection between us and our animal counterparts. Says Hasegawa, “…bears are highly respected in many cultures and are considered to be ancestral spirits. Each of my bear paintings is created with the intent of being a protector; personally for myself and for everyone that may come across my work.”

In a large-scale installation, Hasegawa has crafted a cave from corrugated sheet metal, wood, and other found objects. By calling the work “Os Pukas,” Hasegawa has combined Portuguese and Hawaiian, using the word puka, or hole, to reference both a habitable space and the artist’s Hawaiian roots. Visually connected to shanty towns, such as the favelas of Brazil, the installation is both a bear’s den and a symbol of global struggles to find shelter and security. The work speaks to the fundamental need for habitable spaces, connecting us in the most primal of ways to the animal world. In addition to the installation, paintings, and sculptural works, Hasegawa will also paint a mural outside the Household Hazardous Waste Facility.

"/

Port-au-Prince to San Francisco: Work by Claudel Casseus, Romel Jean Pierre, and Racine Polycarpe

Beginning in mid-August the Recology Artist in Residence Program will welcome Claudel Casseus, Romel Jean Pierre, and Racine Polycarpe to the San Francisco Solid Waste Transfer and Recycling Center. The artists live and work in Grand Rue, Port-au-Prince, Haiti and are part of Atis-Rezistans, an artist collective whose members use recycled materials to create assemblage art. Their mini-residency at Recology is sponsored by Project HOPE Art, a local non-profit. This will be the first time artists from outside the Bay Area have participated in Recology’s residency program.

Claudel Casseus
Claudel Casseus was born in 1981 in Grand Rue, Port-au-Prince, a neighborhood with a strong art and creative community. From a young age Casseus made art and in 2008, he joined Atis-Rezistans. In 2009, he participated in the 1st Ghetto Biennial, an international arts festival organized by Atis-Rezistans and British artist/curator Leah Gordon. During the Biennale, Casseus met British artist Bill Drummond, and after the 2010 Haitian earthquake he collaborated with Drummond on Imajine, a book describing his experiences following the disaster. Casseus’s sculptures, informed by Vodou and made from recycled materials, have been included in many exhibitions. This will be Casseus’s first trip outside of Haiti.

“I grew up in a large ghetto in Port-au-Prince, a place that has a lot of trash around. I take advantage of this situation by creating artwork with the same garbage found in the community. I think this is a way to educate people who live in the area, to make people understand that it is not necessary to keep throwing trash in the street. Because with art, any number of things can be created. Definitely, art is a means of communication with everyone, regardless of social differences. Art can help a person to manage the frustration inside him and it enables you to say what you feel is happening in the world, whether positive or negative. Therefore, I think a person who chooses to make art is a person who wants to collaborate with the world.”

Romel Jean Pierre
Growing up in Port-au-Prince, where he was born in 1993, Romel Jean Pierre initially was interested in becoming a politician, but turned his focus to art when he attended the 1st Ghetto Biennale. He joined the youth division of Atis-Rezistans, called Timoun Rezistans, and began creating the video performance/citizen media series, Tele Ghetto Haiti. For the 2nd Ghetto Biennale he collaborated with Bay Area artist and writer Robert Gomez on Dreams/Rèv Ou, a video project in which Haitians speak about their hopes for the future. Romel’s works have been exhibited widely. In 2011 he was a visiting artist at Bates College in Maine, and in April, 2013 he attended the Tribecca Film Festival in New York where he participated in a panel discussion on Inside Out-The People’s Art Project, a documentary film about the French artist JR who worked with Romel in Haiti. Tele Ghetto video works can be seen on Facebook and Youtube. Romel will head the new photography program at the Project HOPE Art Center located at Haiti Communitere, in Port-au-Prince. The Art Center is housed in a converted 20-foot shipping container.

“The Rezistans movement means many things to me, because when I wasn’t part of it, I knew I would spend each day not doing anything and that knowing life would pass me by as I joked around, not going to school and losing all good chances in my life…”

Racine Polycarpe
In 2006 at the age of fifteen, Racine Polycarpe was adopted by his uncle, the well-known artist, Jean Hérard Celeur. He worked as an apprentice at his uncle’s school, the Realm of the Arts and Minds, in Grand Rue, Port-au-Prince, where he learned about contemporary art history, the skills of carving wood and rubber, and how to create sculptural works from found objects. Polycarpe is also a member of Atis-Rezistans, which was founded by his uncle. His work has been exhibited in Haiti at the Institut Francais (2009), the Fet Gede at the National Cemetery (2009), the 1st and 2nd Ghetto Biennales (2009, 2011), and Nouvo Rezistans at the Institut Francais (2011). In 2010 his work was exhibited at the Portman Gallery in London, and at the XISM Etnografiska Museet in Stockholm. This will be his first trip outside of Haiti.

“I make sculpture out of recycled materials such as wood, plastic, metal, rubber, and anything I find. I also make painted sculptures with carved rubber from old tires. The reason I use these materials as my medium is because, in my country, when people are finished using things they just throw them outside. As artists we see value in these things and turn them into art following the history of assemblage art. It is a transformative act to take these discarded objects off the street and turn them into art.”

About the Recology Artist in Residence Program

Since 1990, the Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco has encouraged the conservation of natural resources while instilling a greater appreciation for art and the environment in children and adults. This one-of-a-kind program enables artists to work in studio space on site for four months, use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, and speak to students and the general public about reuse and their residency experiences. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

When:

Reception-Friday, September 20, 2013, 5-9pm

Reception-Saturday, September 21, 2013, 1-3pm

Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, September 24, 2013, 5-7pm

Artist panel discussion-Tuesday, September 24, 7pm

Where:

Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible.
http://www.recology.com/AIR

Recology – Art at the Dump – Issue No. 7

Posted in Portland, Recology, Resource Recovery, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on July 1, 2013
header_7.jpg

Current Resident Artists

Kristin Cammermeyer and Chad Hasegawa began their residencies on June 1. Both artists are busy scavenging lumber that they’ll be using in very different ways. Kristin is building a large-scale installation in the back room and Chad is constructing panels for his paintings. Kristin’s installation is already in progress and in a perpetual state of flux. She is filming the work as she alters it, while also filming sites around the facility that are in constant change. We’re very happy to report that we’ve received the green light to have Chad paint a mural outside our Household Hazardous Waste Facility which will feature his signature bear imagery. If you’re dropping off paint, batteries, or other materials in the next three months, look out for Chad as you pull out of the driveway! Their residency exhibition will take place on Friday, September 20 from 5-9pm and Saturday, September 21 from 1-3pm.

9145792984_e372f0fe2b_q_1.jpg 9145785322_9b30c9b6ac_q_2.jpg

line.png

Visiting Artists from Haiti

Beginning in mid-August the Recology Artist in Residence Program will welcome three visiting artists from Haiti: Claudel Casseus, Romel Jean Pierre, and Racine Polycarpe. Sponsored by Project Hope Art, this mini-residency will enable the artists to use our student studio (the shipping container behind our offices), and scavenge for materials to make their art. The artists will work on-site for approximately one month and exhibit finished and in-process artwork at the Environmental Learning Center at 401 Tunnel Avenue during our September exhibition. The artists belong to Atis-Rezistans, an artist collective in Port-au-Prince whose members use recycled materials to create assemblage art. This will be Claudel and Racine’s first trip outside of Haiti.

claudelcasseus_200x200.jpg romeljeanpierre_200x200.jpg racinepolycarpe_200x200.jpg

line.png

We’re Accepting Applications!

Applications for 2014 residencies are due August 30th. For information on how to apply and to download an application:

line.png

GLEAN exhibition

2013 GLEAN residency artists will exhibit their work August 16 to September 8 at Disjecta in Portland, Oregon. This is the third year of the Portland-based program developed collaboratively by Recology; Cracked Pots, Inc., an environmental arts organization; and Metro, the regional government for the Portland metropolitan area. Artists Kim Lakin, Owen Premore, Eric Rosewall, Christopher Wagner, and Vicki Wilson have been working since March, scavenging for materials at the Portland Transfer Station to make their art. An opening reception will be held August 16, from 6-9pm.
www.disjecta.org

9143739317_981a0aaba3_m_7.jpg

line.png

The Art of Recology at SFO Museum on exhibit through October

We continue to hear good things from folks who have traveled on United Airlines and have seen our exhibition in Terminal 3 at SFO. Over one-hundred pieces made by forty-five artists during their Recology residencies are on display in The Art of Recology. Because the exhibition is past security and only viewable by passengers ticketed for United, a website has been created featuring video and photos of the exhibition. Experience the show virtually at: recologysf.com/SFO

line.png

Alumni News

Current resident artist Kristin Cammermeyer has received a MacDowell Colony residency and will be there this fall after completing her work at Recology.

Updates on The Genius of Marian, Banker White’s film which follows his mother’s battle with Alzheimer’s disease, can be found here. The film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and will be screened in Russia at the Moscow Film Festival this month.

Stephanie Syjuco will be busy prior to her October-January Recology residency. In addition to participating in exhibitions in cities including New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and São Paulo, Brazil, she will be an artist-in-residence at the FLACC Workplace for Visual Artists in Genk, Belgium, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, in Omaha, and ACRE in Steuben, Wisconsin.

Nicole Repack is one of four artists in the Triton Museum of Art exhibition, Spiral: Art of the Street. The show runs from September 14 to November 17.

Upcoming Recology artist-in-resident Yulia Pinkusevich will be in Paris from July to September participating in the Cite International des Arts residency. Her work was included in the films 3020 Laguna St. In Exitum and Umoja-One. 3020 Laguna St. In Exitum premiered at the San Francisco International Film festival and features the installations of seven local artists; Umoja-One documents a collaborative project with dancer/performer Rahan Boxley and is Official Selection for the San Francisco Black Film Festival.

Dana Albany’s spaceship, The Y.E.S. Project, will be installed outside the Exploratorium on August 12. At night it will be illuminated with 130 slowly changing sequences. People will be able to crawl into the spaceship August 17 when it is part of the Exploratorium’s Trashformationevent.

Colette Crutcher and Aileen Barr are completing tilework at Cesar Chavez Park in Oakland’s Fruitvale District. The park will open in mid-July. Crutcher and Barr are also collaborating on a 75-foot-high, tiled stairway in the Sunset. There will be a community participation workshop for this project on July 20th, 1-5pm. See www.hiddengardensteps.org for more information.

Suzanne Husky has created Jardin a la Française Sauvage for the Milieux exhibition at the Domaine de Chamarande in Essonne, France. Husky has made a large French garden composed of flowers beneficial to birds and bees. It is on view through September 30.

Donna Ozawa’s Waribashi Project can be seen in Nature’s Toolbox: Biodiversity, Art and Invention at the Ulrich Museum of Art in Wichita Kansas, August 31 to December 17.

James Sansing won a grant from the Sustainable Arts Foundation. The foundation provides monetary support to parents pursuing creative work.

Michael Damm will have work in the exhibition Artists Who Teach at the Wiegand Gallery at Notre Dame de Namur University, September 17 to October 26. Damm’s work is also included in Afterglow: Rethinking California Light and Space Art at St. Mary’s College Museum of Art running from August 4 to September 29.

Erik Otto’s solo exhibition, Searching For Higher Ground, will be at the Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco. The exhibition is on view from August 17 to September 23, with an opening reception August 17 from 6-9pm.

Work by Val Britton will be included in the exhibition Journey Forth: Contemporary Landscape Between Technology and Tradition at Gallery Wendi Norris from July 11 to August 31. Over the summer she will also have work in exhibitions in cities including New York and Laguna Beach. She was recently profiled in Art Ltd. Magazine.

Barbara Holmes recently completed a residency in Virginia City, Nevada through Capital City Arts Initiative (CCAI). Work can be viewed here. A reception will be July 12th, 5-9pm at SMAC in Virginia City. Holmes will be an artist-in-residence at the Facebook campus in Menlo Park for six weeks this summer and will be working on a lath installation there (among other activities).

For the month of July, Karrie Hovey will be an artist-in-residence at Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesin in East in Spring Green, Wisconsin.

Work by former Recology artists-in-residence, Val Britton, Lauren DiCioccio, Julia Goodman, Jeff Hantman, Barbara Holmes, David King, Christina Mazza, Scott Oliver, and Sudhu Tewari will be featured in the de Saisset Museum’s exhibition Reduce, Reuse, Re-Imagine, from August 16 to December 6.

A watch band designed by Sirron Norris for the company Basis has recently been released. His bus stop posters promoting the San Francisco Public Library are on view around the city.

David King’s work will appear in the three-person show Cut & Paste at Hang Art Gallery in San Francisco. The show runs from July 1 to 15, with a reception July 11, 6-8pm. In August, King will be a resident artist at the Lucid Art Foundation in Inverness.

Julia Goodman will be a resident artist at Lost Coast Cultural Machine in Fort Bragg, California from August to September. Her work will be included in the exhibition, Around the Table: Food, Creativity, Community, at the San Jose Museum of Art, November 9, 2013 to April 27, 2014.

James Gouldthorpe recently received a residency at Villa Montalvo. He will be there in 2014.

logos.jpg

image001.png image002.png image003.png

Recology San Francisco, Art at the Dump Artist in Residence Exhibitions: 
Work by Benjamin Cowden, Ian Treasure and Hannah Quinn

Posted in Events, Recology, Recycling, San Francisco, WASTE ZERO, You Should Know... by art at the dump on May 6, 2013

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Benjamin Cowden, Ian Treasure, and student artist Hannah Quinn on Friday, May 17, from 5-9pm and Saturday, May 18, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, May 21, from 5-7pm. Please note the new Saturday hours and additional Tuesday viewing time. Music will be provided Friday night by dj Joshua Pieper and on Saturday The Insufferables will perform. This exhibition will be the culmination of four months of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.

Benjamin Cowden: Lunar Cassowaries
The cassowary, a large flightless bird, serves as a point of reference for Benjamin Cowden’s series of kinetic sculptures. Cowden’s works explore motion, flight, and wind-propulsion via unlikely combinations of found materials. Cowden has modified kites, umbrellas, and wind sails to make wing-like forms, but much like the cassowary, these winged creatures don’t leave the ground. They do, however, move or respond to human interaction—often in surprising ways. Cowden has harvested motion sensors from outdoor lights and novelty candles, and in combination with windshield wiper motors, tent poles, fishing reel gears and his own skillfully designed circuits, has created works that not only use, but generate energy.

Cowden explains, “In a society so focused on energy consumption, it seems especially fitting to re-purpose the detritus of that consumption not only into works of art, but into devices which in turn create their own energy.” Cowden’s sculptures also prompt us to think about our relationship to the natural world. The crafting of bird-like forms from the waste stream in turn poses questions about the waste stream’s effects on actual birds and other animals. Assembled together his sculptures appear like residents of a sanctuary for the rarest and most unusual of creatures. But unlike the cassowaries which are truly endangered and whose future is uncertain, these mechanical beings made with objects from the waste stream are here to stay.

Cowden received his MFA in metalsmithing from Southern Illinois University at Carbondate. He is an instructor at the Crucible in Oakland and has been an artist-in-residence at the Appalachian Center for Crafts in Cookeville, Tennessee and at Monochrom in Vienna, Austria.

Ian Treasure: Road to Nowhere
Commonplace symbols and objects so ubiquitous in our lives that we hardly give them a second thought are the subject of Ian Treasure’s work. In his sculptures and installations he employs repetitive forms and modern mechanics in tandem with the playful use of time and duration. Works have an anthropomorphic quality, demanding our attention with sounds and movements filled with personality. Humor and surprise are key components, but works also have an element of poignancy and provide space for reflection on the complexities, as well as absurdities, of life.

In Treasure’s Road to Nowhere a small toy taxicab travels on a never-ending journey. Less a feel good road trip than an existential expedition, the taxi rides along a conveyer belt highway, following an infinite dotted line. Unlike a car, symbolic of individual exploration and freedom, the taxicab speaks to relinquishing or losing control of the journey—be it in our own lives or on a larger, societal level. When placed against the backdrop of the dump, it can serve as a metaphor for loss of control over our consumption and its environmental implications. Treasure’s other works include a group of trouble-maker school desks and a liberated drum snare.

Treasure received an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and has been an artist-in-residence at the Djarassi Residency Artist Program in Woodside, California. He has participated in exhibitions in London, at the Pasadena Museum of California Art, and at the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art in San Jose, California.

"/

Hannah Quinn: Beyond the Bower
During her residency Hannah Quinn has created functional works that reference the traditions of craftspeople and home hobbyists, while also exploring utilitarian forms. Quinn has scavenged wood of all kinds—from a skateboard maker’s scraps to legs pulled from old tables and chairs—to play with the shapes of benches, stools, ladders and other simple, yet versatile objects.

A homemade stool has served as the model for Quinn’s own series of stools. Years of wear and repair visible in the old stool point to a time when furniture and household items were not disposable commodities, and illustrate how this basic object functioned within the life of those who used it. Quinn’s stools—50 identical forms out of construction-grade lumber scraps— illustrate the abundances of modern life and pose questions about mass-production vs. the homemade. Her stools also pay tribute to the original object’s maker and caretakers, and act as blank canvases for future lifetimes of use and repair.

Quinn, who is an undergraduate studying furniture design at the California College of the Arts, identifies one of the motivations behind her work as the desire to create objects that promote human interaction. Quinn will also exhibit small found items as scientific specimens, highlighting beloved tools and oddball objects found in the discards from home and professional workshops.

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco is a one-of-a-kind program established in 1990 to encourage the conservation of natural resources and instill a greater appreciation for the environment and art in children and adults. Artists work for four months in studio space on site, use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, and speak to students and the general public. Over ninety-five professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

When:
Reception-Friday, May 17, 2013, 5-9pm
Reception-Saturday, May 18, 2013, 1-3pm
Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 5-7pm

Where:
Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible.
http://www.recologysf.com/AIR/nextshow.htm

San Francisco Dump Artist in Residence Exhibitions: Work by Michael Damm, Julia Goodman and Jeff Hantman

Posted in Events, Recology, Resource Recovery, San Francisco by art at the dump on January 9, 2013

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Michael Damm, Julia Goodman, and Jeff Hantman on Friday, January 25, from 5-9pm and Saturday, January 26, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, January 29, from 5-7pm. An artist panel discussion will follow at 7pm at 401 Tunnel Avenue. Please note the new Saturday hours and additional Tuesday viewing time. This exhibition will be the culmination of four months of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.

Michael Damm: Incidental Films for an Accidental Audience, On Tunnel
During his residency Michael Damm has created a new video installation for his ongoing series, Incidental Films for an Accidental Audience. In these projects, Damm uses rear projection to present site-specific videos at night in large windows or doorways along transit corridors. Geared to an audience of commuters or others who may serendipitously find the work, the installations present fleeting glimpses of familiar, yet nonspecific scenes of urban life, and reflect back the viewer’s own lived experience. Works serve as sites for cognitive disruption, momentarily shaking viewers from their mental routines and leaving fragments of images for the viewer to take away and puzzle out. At Recology, Damm will use a series of windows in the Environmental Learning Center at 401 Tunnel Avenue as his projection screen. The installation will be viewable throughout the month of January (excluding Wednesdays) from dusk to midnight.

Damm’s second installation work, viewable only during exhibition hours, uses images from a scavenged collection of slides taken by a photojournalist. Damm has layered multiple shots of specific scenes to create complex readings of past events and explore perceptions of time, history, and representation. The majority of photographs were taken at political events in the 1980s that have long receded from public memory. Deprived of their temporal context and documentary underpinnings these scenes of public diplomacy and governmental machinations become generically enigmatic instead of historically significant. Through the overlayering of multiple shots—each minutely different, yet of the same scene—Damm has created images that move into one-another and then quickly slip out of reach. Work captures the banality that surrounds the pursuit of the photographic “decisive moment,” while also speaking to the slippery nature of documentation in general, and how some events are historicized while others are relegated to the landfill.

Damm received an MFA from Mills College. He has exhibited widely in the Bay Area including at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco, and has exhibited in venues internationally including in Brazil, Germany, England, and Macedonia.

Julia Goodman: Rag Sorters and Star Gazers
Though Julia Goodman’s primary medium is paper which she makes by hand and uses to create sculptural forms, the vast offerings of the dump have inspired her to venture from this predominantly muted, monochromatic world and explore new materials and vivid colors. A found collection of water-damaged glass photographic slides, in combination with a personal interest in astronomy, has resulted in a body of work that references the power of the night sky. Resulting images are dreamy views of terrestrial scenes merged with celestial forces. Other works address ideas of navigation, and the role of the stars as literal and figurative guides.

In a separate body of work, Goodman returns to her paper-making practice and looks at the intertwined relationship women have had with rag paper over centuries—both as procurers and providers of the fabrics used in its production. Bringing a San Francisco focus to this history, Goodman interviewed a former Recology employee and learned that it was not until compactor trucks were widely used in 1964 that the city’s garbage collectors stopped gathering rags for recycling. Prior to this date, collected fabrics were brought to a room where female employees sorted them, doing dirty and difficult work. Having learned the names of several of these women, Goodman set out to honor them in her own papermaking practice. She replicated their process by sorting fabrics she had scavenged and then pulped the material. Using pre-1964 elegant fonts found in ephemeral materials such as Metropolitan Opera programs, Goodman recreated the women’s names in carved molds. She then pressed the pulped rags into her carvings to create her tributes. Elevated from their humble employment, Rita Bianchi, Maria Tringale, and Josephine Grosso’s names appear in grand style in Goodman’s paper relief works.

Goodman has an MFA from the California College of Arts and Crafts and a BA in International Relations and Peace and Justice Studies from Tufts University. She has exhibited widely in the Bay Area and has participated in residencies at J.B. Blunk Residency in Inverness, California, and at the Georgia Tech Research Institute in Kona, Hawaii.

"/
Jeff Hantman: Unassigned
Jeff Hantman combines a range of techniques and materials to create three-dimensional paintings that bow and bulge out from the wall. Hantman’s background as a woodworker informs his process which requires bending and shaping found materials, especially plywood, to create the rounded forms he uses as his canvases. Works are covered with materials chosen for their graphic or textual quality and then layered with his silkscreened and painted imagery. Signs of wear, stains, paint, and other remnants of the material’s previous use are incorporated into the pieces that are influence by deteriorating structures such as old barns or water towers, as well as personal memories of places and events.

While at Recology, Hantman has expanded his practice to include free-standing sculptural works. Now viewers can walk around his forms and view the frameworks that underlie his characteristic curved shapes, seeing interiors which are as visually compelling as their exteriors. Some works include a mechanical element, and the combination of this with Hantman’s weatherworn iconography results in sculptures that appear like obsolete contraptions or mysterious machines from a bygone era. Hantman describes these new pieces as the manifestation of childhood daydreams—fantasy objects built from the unlimited contents of the toy box that is the Public Disposal and Recycling Area. Much like his three-dimensional wall works that defy easy categorization, these free-standing assemblages provide space for interpretation rooted in imagination and memory.

Hantman received a BFA in printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design. He has participated in residency programs at Kala Institute in Berkeley and the Djerassi Resident Artist Program in Woodside, California. His work is in the collection of the Alameda County Arts Commission.

When:
Reception-Friday, January 25, 2013, 5-9pm
Reception-Saturday, January 26, 2013, 1-3pm
Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, January 29, 2013, 5-7pm
Artist panel discussion-Tuesday, January 29, 7pm at 401 Tunnel Ave.

Where:
Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible. http://www.recologysf.com/AIR

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 244 other followers

%d bloggers like this: