Recology

Artist in Residence Program Announces 2015 Residency Recipients

Posted in Diversion, Recycling, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on December 9, 2014

Recology San Francisco is pleased to announce recipients of artist residencies for 2015. The six selected artists are Michael Arcega, Jeremiah Barber, Ma Li, Jenny Odell, Alison Pebworth, and Chris Sollars.

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco is a one-of-a-kind initiative started in 1990 to support Bay Area artists, while also teaching children and adults about recycling and resource conservation. Artists work for four months in a studio on site and use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

http://www.recologysf.com/AIR


Michael Arcega and Ma Li
Residency: February-May; Exhibition reception: May 22 and 23, 2015

As an interdisciplinary artist, Michael Arcega works across media to create art that is informed by language, history, and geography. In his most recent work he has adopted methodologies used in the anthropological study of world cultures that often emphasize “otherness,” but Arcega turns the tables, positioning North America as ‘the other” whose symbols and rituals must be studied and understood. Though a socio-political critique, Arcega’s work also has a playful element, providing familiar entry points to alternative ways of thinking about the people who colonize the landscape. Arcega is an Assistant Professor of Art at San Francisco State University. He received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. In 2012, he was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. His work has been exhibited at the Asia Society in New York, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Honolulu Academy of Art, and the Orange Country Museum of Art in Newport Beach.
Ma Li uses non-traditional art media and discarded materials to create sculpture and installations. Her dream-like, large-scale, frequently suspended forms reference her Chinese heritage and often appear like temples, lanterns, or ceremonial architecture. But titles of works, such as Retrofuture City and 633 Hours to Intergalactica!, in combination with her materials that include vividly-colored plastics, lights, and mylar, speak to the meeting of tradition and pop culture; the ordinary and the fantastic; and the hand-made and mass-produced. She describes her works as “imbued with a sense of a celebration and a reminiscence of identity: from a woman in a collective society to a citizen of the planet.” Ma received an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and a BS in Chemical Engineering from Shanghai Dong Hua University. In 2014, she was the recipient of a Pollack-Krasner Foundation Fellowship. She is also the recipient of a Murphy and Cadogan Contemporary Art Award and a Knight Foundation Finalist Grant. She has exhibited at SOMArts, Root Division, and Swell Gallery in San Francisco, and has been an artist in residence at the Elsewhere Museum in Greensboro, North Carolina and the Vermont Studio Center.

Jenny Odell and Chris Sollars
Residency: June-September; Exhibition reception: September 18 and 19, 2015

Jenny Odell uses found imagery from sources such as Google Maps to create “portraits” of systems ranging from waste-water treatment plants to popular web searches. She has located satellite images of the factories world-wide where all the items she wore, ate or bought over the course of one day were produced, and has gathered aerial photos of 97 nuclear cooling towers together in a single image that is as aesthetically pleasing as it is disturbingly fascinating. Her work makes visible infrastructures and sources of production that play a role in our daily lives, but which are often hidden. She describes herself as “not so much a photographer as a collector.” Odell received an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and a BA from the University of California at Berkeley. She is the recipient of a San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist Grant, and has exhibited at Intersection for the Arts, White Walls, and SOMArts in San Francisco, and in New York, Paris, and Barcelona. Her work has been featured in The EconomistWIREDFrieze, and The Atlantic.
Chris Sollars’ art involves the reclamation and subversion of public space through interventions and performance. His work can be experienced in two ways—through the witnessing of, or participation in, a performative event, or later viewing the documentation of the event in a gallery context via installations that combine photography, video, and sculpture. Sollars’ process is physical and conceptual as he juxtaposes dissimilar elements to create unexpected forms that are often comedic. Sollars received an MFA from Bard College and a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2013, he was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has received a San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist Commission Grant, a Eureka Fellowship Award, Artadia Grant, Headlands Center for the Arts Residency, and has exhibited in venues nationally and internationally. His work is in the permanent collection of the Berkeley Art Museum and his Left Behind sculpture series was most recently published by Publication Studio in 2013.

Jeremiah Barber and Alison Pebworth
Residency: October-January; Exhibition reception: January 22 and 23, 2016

Working in performance, video, sculpture, and installation, Jeremiah Barber explores ideas of transcendence, as well as perseverance, memory, and personal mythologies. Using his own body in performances that have incorporated elements such as fire, water and smoke, Barber investigates the realms of both the physical and the metaphysical. Though elegantly minimal in their execution, his attempts at near-impossible actions also include humor and illuminate the absurdity and wonder at the core of what it means to be human. Barber received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from Columbia College in Chicago. He is the recipient of a Eureka Fellowship, a San Francisco Arts Commission Individual Artist Grant, and from 2005-07 was an exhibiting member of Marina Abramovic’s independent performance group. He has exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and in the Bay Area at Southern Exposure, SOMArts, the Headlands Center for the Arts, and The Lab.
Alison Pebworth explores aspects of contemporary life and culture using the tropes and traditions of an earlier America through projects such as her Beautiful Possibility tour in which she traveled to 25 venues across the United States and Canada. Her work is equal parts social practice, public performance, and fine art exhibition, and harkens back to a time of traveling performers and sideshow curiosities. Pebworth’s projects are often long-range and involve the gathering of data to bring to light the ailments of our sped up, high tech world, for which she provides metaphorical (and sometimes actual) elixirs. Pebworth is the recipient of Artist Grants from the San Francisco Arts Commission and the Center for Cultural Innovation and has been an artist-in-residence at numerous institutions including Ucross Foundation, Claremont, WY and the de Young Museum. She has exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Detroit, the Salt Lake Art Center, in Salt Lake City, and in the Bay Area at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Southern Exposure and Headlands Center for the Arts. Her work is included in Rebecca Solnit’s Infinite City.

Recology – Artist in Residence Program – Issue No. 11

Posted in Community, Diversion, Recology, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on November 12, 2014

Current Resident Artists

Kara Maria and Imin Yeh have hit the ground running, adapting to scavenging while also being incredibly productive. Within the first two weeks of their residencies Kara had nine paintings simultaneously in progress and Imin had created an entire alphabet of hand-carved movable type. Kara is experimenting with mark-making with found objects and plans on including representations of the wide range of animals at the facility—from hawks to flies—in her paintings. Imin has been carving wood printing blocks based on original artwork she’s found, and is also working on a quilt from discarded uniforms. Student artist Matthew Goldberg is collecting items that were once considered futuristic in order to explore our relationship to outer space. He’s been thinking about what might happen if we were to send our trash out into the galaxy—an idea some people have actually proposed. We’re excited to see what Kara, Imin, and Matthew will make in the coming months. Their end of residency exhibition will take place January 23, 24 and 27.

Beehive Cob Oven Gets a Second Life

After the Hayes Valley Farm closed in June 2013, we were the fortunate recipients of its cob oven. Though it took some time to build a new base and reinstall the oven, we completed the project in time for our last exhibition reception. Shaped like a beehive, the oven is now in the vegetable garden behind the art studio. During the Saturday reception we cooked pizzas in the oven for the public, topped with vegetables harvested from our garden.

The cob oven was built by Miguel Elliott of Living Earth Structures and participants of the Hayes Valley Farm’s permaculture course in May, 2012. The farm was a volunteer-led community project almost a city-block in size, located on the site of a former freeway onramp at Laguna Street between Fell and Oak Streets in San Francisco. The farm existed for three years through an interim use agreement with the City. Today condominiums are being built on the land. We are honored to have the oven here and keep the spirit of Hayes Valley Farm alive.  For more information about the Farm and the other urban agriculture projects it has inspired, visit hayesvalleyfarm.tumblr.com.

Selection of New Artists

We are currently in the process of selecting artists for 2015 residencies and will announce residency recipients in early December. If you are interested in applying for a 2016 residency, we will begin taking applications in late spring. The application deadline will be August 31, 2015. For more information about how to apply, please visit recology.com/AIR.

 

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Exhibitions

Work from the Recology Artist in Residence Program was recently exhibited at 2 Blocks of Art, an annual art walk on 6th Street in San Francisco. From January 5 to March 4 work will be exhibited in the lobby of 350/400 California Street, and from March 10 to 22 there will be an exhibition of Recology artwork in Los Angeles at the Voila Gallery at 518 N. LaBrea Avenue.

Gardener in Residence

In 2015, we will begin a Gardener in Residence Program, organized with the guidance of Garden for the Environment. Gardeners will have access to the Recology Sculpture Garden for projects and will work on site for four months. Information regarding the program will be posted on our website in December.

 

Alumni News

Re:New, an exhibition curated by Nemo Gould and Jeff Hantman and featuring new artwork by former Recology resident artists, is up at Lost and Foundry Oakland. Artists in the exhibition are Micah Gibson, Nemo Gould, Barbara Holmes, Ferris Plock, Lauren DiCioccio, Jeff Hantman, Benjamin Cowden, Yulia Pinkusevich, and Hannah Quinn. The exhibition will be on view through November 22, by appointment only.

James Sansing is the recipient of a 2014/15 Pollock Krasner Grant for painting. His film Verses is included in the Biennial of the Moving Image (BIM) in Buenos Aires in November, and he has been commissioned by Christian Dior to create three paintings for their Soho location in New York.

Lauren DiCioccio’s recent solo exhibition at Jack Fischer Gallery was reviewed by Kenneth Baker in the San Francisco Chronicle.She is currently an affiliate artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts.

Work by Jeff Hantman is included in the 28th Annual Emeryville Art Exhibition. The show runs through November 2, and is open daily, 11am-6pm. He is also in an exhibition at The Compound Gallery, opening November 1, and will have several works on exhibition in the space’s new Fabrefaction Gallery.

Work by Stephanie Syjuco is included in the Alien She exhibition at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, on view until January 25. She is also currently at the Workshop Residence where she is developing a collection of garments featuring a non-repeating dazzle screen print inspired by the camouflage systems used on WWI battleships.

Jeremy Rourke will be screening and performing with his stop-motion collage videos at Shapeshifters Cinema in Oakland on November 16. He will be showing a number of works, including the videos he made during his Recology residency.

Sirron Norris, Val Britton, and current Recology artists-in-residence Kara Maria and Imin Yeh all participated in the October 26Passport event, an annual art walk sponsored by the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery.

Karrie Hovey is spending October at the Brush Creek Artist Residency in Saratoga, Wyoming. She is also an affiliate artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and will be exhibiting in the Shunpike Storefronts program in Seattle which enables artists to exhibit their work in vacant storefronts. Her work will be on display on Republican Street in Seattle from November to March.

Samuel Levi Jones is the recipient of the Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize given by the Studio Museum in Harlem. The $50,000 prize is awarded each year to one artist “who demonstrates great innovation, promise, and creativity.” Previous recipients include Gary Simmons, Glenn Ligon, and Lorna Simpson. He also has a solo show, Black White Thread, opening November 8 at Papillion in Los Angeles.

Reddy Lieb will teach glass workshops on November 9 and December 7, 10am-4pm, and a mini workshop on November 30, 1-3pm. Workshops are held at 3535 19th Street. For more information, fees, or to register, please contact Reddy.

Nemo Gould appears in Maker, a documentary on the maker movement.

Michael Kerbow was awarded a grand prize for his painting Critical Mass in the juried show Real Surreal at Sandra Lee Gallery in San Francisco. As part of the award he will be given an exhibition at the gallery in 2015.

Colette Crutcher has completed another mosaic stair project in collaboration with Aileen Barr, the Arelious Walker Stairway in Hunters Point off of Innes Street near the shipyard. She is also working on a grouping of mosaic-clad sculptures that will be installed at Taraval Street and 48th Avenue in early 2015.

Yulia Pinkusevich was selected to create a sculptural seating centerpiece for the new McMurtry Art and Art History building, designed by Diller, Scofidio & Renfro, at Stanford University.

Julia Goodman will teach a tin can papermaking workshop at INTUIT: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art in Chicago on November 22. Her recent beet papyrus work The Root of Scarcity, 2014 will be included in Rooted in Soil, a group exhibition at the DePaul Art Museum, January 29 to April 26, 2015.

Bill Russell will show a series of new abstract paintings in a group show November 15, 16, 22 and 23 from 10am-4pm at ArtBrokers Gallery, 425 Irwin Street, San Rafael.

Mike Kendall will participate in Benicia open studios the first weekend of December. For more information:http://mikekendall.com/.

Paula Pereira, working collaboratively with Swedish artist Pernilla Andersson as t.w.five, will have an installation in the Luggage Store’s new Lower Haight exhibition space. Entitled, Automaton X, the exhibition will open November 15, with a reception at 7pm.Luggage Store Projects @ 457 Haight.

Christine Lee will be an artist-in-residence at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Colorado in February.

Scott Kildall is finishing up a residency at Impact Works in Utrecht in the Netherlands. During the residency he has made a new online art project called EquityBot, a stock-trading algorithm that “invests” in emotions such as anger, joy, disgust and amazement. During stock market hours, EquityBot tracks sentiments on Twitter to gauge how the world is feeling and links these emotions with actual stocks to make investments using a simulated brokerage account.

Kristin Cammermeyer was a recent visiting artist at UC Davis. Mid-May through June she will be producing new work at The Hedreen Gallery at Seattle University in Washington.

Ethan Estess is currently at the Nautilus Lanzarote art residency in the Canary Islands, using materials he finds on the beaches and streets to tell stories about the island’s people and environment. His collage series, Marine Mammals of the Western Hemisphere, will be exhibited at the Pacific Grove Art Center, opening January 9. He began the series when he stumbled upon a 1970s whale poster in the dump during his Recology residency.

Matthew Gottschalk is an artist-in-residence in the Jail Cell studio at Alter Space in San Francisco. His solo show there, This Is Where Home Is, opens December 6th. He will also have an installation, The Higher We Rise, The Further Away I Seem,  in the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery’s Grove Street Windows opening December 16 with an artist talk January 10.

Scott Oliver’s proposal for a public artwork at the corner of Masonic Ave. and Geary Blvd. was chosen by the SF Arts Commission. Entitled Points of Departure, it will be fabricated by San Francisco-based Gizmo Art Production and is expected to be installed in spring, 2016.

Susan Leibovitz Steinman has published the latest edition of the online WEAD Magazine, Issue No. 7 “Cultivating Communities.”

The John A. Legnitto Environmental Learning Center

Posted in Community, Recology, San Francisco by ErinAtRecology on July 22, 2014

John Legnitto Dedication
The Recology San Francisco Environmental Learning Center has been re-named in honor of the late SF Group Manager, John A. Legnitto. Although John lost his battle with cancer on April 26th, 2014, we will always remember the good times we had with him, and the impact that he had on the Recology family.

Thanks to all who helped coordinate this dedication in John’s honor!

 

Recology San Francisco Artist in Residence Exhibitions: Work by Matthew Gottschalk, Jamil Hellu and Claire Lynch

Posted in Community, Diversion, Events, Resource Recovery, San Francisco by art at the dump on May 2, 2014

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Matthew Gottschalk, Jamil Hellu, and student artist Claire Lynch on Friday, May 23, from 5-9pm and Saturday, May 24, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, May 27, from 5-7pm, followed by a gallery walk-through with the artists at 7pm. This exhibition will be the culmination of four months of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.

Matthew Gottschalk: From the Belly of the Whale
Matthew Gottschalk has looked to explorers such as Jacques Cousteau and Carl Sagan for inspiration while on his own epic adventure at the dump. Gottschalk, who in the past has used marionette puppets as protagonists in installations that include sculpture and video components, has crafted a Carl Sagan puppet to explore the cosmos of the Recology facility. Through the use of touchstones of popular culture—and an ever-engaging marionette—Gottschalk brings playfulness to deeper questions of what it means to be human.

Work alludes to Joseph Campbell’s concepts of the “hero’s journey” and universal myths, as well as to the primal human need to bring order and meaning to the world around us through such stories. Gottschalk also references the dangers and mysteries of space and oceanographic exploration; his series of harpoons made from materials including baseball bats and fireplace pokers suggest conquest and being “in the belly of the whale”—both literally and metaphorically—connecting to his own process of hunting for materials in the Public Disposal and Recycling Area. Much like the real Carl Sagan’s “Golden Record,” a collection of audio recordings and photographs representing aspects of life on earth sent into space with the hope that it might one day be found, Gottschalk’s marionette Carl Sagan has collected the evidence of life on earth through its detritus so that we may better know ourselves. Gottschalk will also create a soundtrack for the journey played on revived and newly created musical instruments.

Gottschalk holds an MFA from Mills College, a BA in studio art from the University of California at Davis, and has studied at Yale. He was the recipient of a fellowship at Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany, and he has exhibited his artwork and videos in Nevada City, California; Stuttgart and Kassel, Germany; Gaza, Palestine; and Rijeka, Croatia.


Jamil Hellu: Portraits
The images photographer Jamil Hellu has made during his Recology residency explore a range of ideas related to identity and portraiture. Examining how we create and negotiate our identities throughout our lives, Hellu looks at our memories via objects, and contemplates the pivotal influences that shape who we are. The work questions the shifting nature of identity and the many roles we play in our personal and professional lives. In some cases, Hellu places the things he has photographed alongside their images and brings poignancy to mundane yet once cherished items. He also replicates scenes in found photographs that are simultaneously humorous and touching, pointing to commonalities between seemingly different people.

Work also explores identity in crisis and what it means to dispose of key markers of identity in a place like the public dump. If throwing away things, especially photographs, is a metaphor for the loss of individual identity, then the dump pile, becomes a homogenous monument to general human experience. Illustrating this is Hellu’s shredded pile of one-hundred snapshots of people at the Golden Gate Bridge—both a permanent erasure of these specific memories and an evocation of the universal significance this destination holds in people’s lives. Other photographs expand on this Bay Area and California love, as well as a love of photography itself.

Born in Brazil, Hellu received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. He has been a recipient of a Graduate Student Fellowship from the Headlands Center for the Arts and received a residency at Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His recent series of photographs, Guardians of the Golden Gate, which capture friends in superhero guises of their own choosing in locations around the Bay Area, has been the subject of national media coverage.

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Claire Lynch: Befriending Demons
In a series of large-scale, abstract, sculptural bird forms, Claire Lynch explores difficult human emotions and how we negotiate and deal with these feelings. Of particular interest to Lynch are feelings such as tension, anger, or discomfort—emotions universally experienced, yet often condemned as socially unacceptable to express. Lynch explores the role these emotions have in shaping who we are, and how sometimes the things that are the most difficult to navigate provide space for the greatest growth. Four sculptures each address different responses to these emotions and represent concealment, routine, balance, and embrace. Together they point to the need to acknowledge and understand the place these feelings have in our lives.

Claire Lynch will receive her BA in studio art from Stanford University this June. She has taught art at the American Overseas School of Rome Summer Program in Italy, and at the Potomac School Summer Program in McLean, Virginia. While a student at Stanford, Lynch has worked as an assistant at the Stanford University Art Gallery, and as a fabricator.


About the Recology Artist in Residence Program

Since 1990, the Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco has encouraged the conservation of natural resources while instilling a greater appreciation for art and the environment in children and adults. This one-of-a-kind program enables artists to work in studio space on site for four months, use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, and speak to students and the general public about reuse and their residency experiences. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

When:
Reception- Friday, May 23, 2014, 5-9pm
Reception-Saturday, May 24, 2014, 1-3pm
Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 5-7pm with gallery walk-through with artists at 7pm

Where:
Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible. http://www.recologysf.com/AIR

SF Residents Can Recycle Old Clothes, Linens, and Other Textiles

Posted in Diversion, Resource Recovery, San Francisco, Waste Reduction, WASTE ZERO by ErinAtRecology on April 30, 2014

Recology Textile RecyclingUnwanted or worn out clothes and other textiles, such as fabrics woven from thread or yarn, can be recycled through Recology’s RecycleMyJunk program. SF Residents can call (415) 330-1300 to schedule a pickup or email us through the “contact us” form on our website, RecycleMyJunk.com.

Our textile recycling program also accepts backpacks, purses, belts, and shoes. Recology will take all textiles, even if torn or ripped, as long as they are dry. When placing textiles by the curb for your scheduled pickup, please bundle them with string or place them in a box or bag clearly labeled “Textiles.”

RecycleMyJunk is an appointment-based program and part of the collection services we provide in San Francisco under City oversight. To view program rules go to RecycleMyJunk.com. Residential customers can now include boxes and bundles of textiles without them counting toward the per-collection item limit. Residential customers can also request “Textile Only” collections at no additional charge.

Recology donates textiles collected through the RecycleMyJunk program to St. Vincent de Paul Society, who sorts and re-purposes the materials.

The Great Compost Giveaway – April 12, 2014

Posted in Community, Composting, Recology, Resource Recovery, San Francisco, WASTE ZERO by ErinAtRecology on March 13, 2014

Recology Compost Giveaway

Turning Municipal Waste into Energy: Recology Runs on Alternative Fuel

Guest blogger, Chris Choate, VP of Sustainability at Recology, leads us through the dynamic world of creating biofuels.

Recology BiodieselRecology is driven to find the social, environmental, and economical solution to power our fleet of vehicles with fuel produced from the residual resources (waste material) from your trash. We’ve spent a lot of time evaluating and researching ways to generate and utilize bio-methane from our landfills and anaerobic digesters to power our trucks.

Our solution has proved to be a good one thus far.  We’ve found a way to integrate biofuels into our fleet fuel sources by transitioning to alternative fuel  equipment and utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG) and B20 biodiesel.  

Recology continues to partner with the City of San Francisco in an effort to lead the nation in diverting material from landfills to achieve the highest use of all materials. Over 80% of the material diverted is collected through an integrated system of reduction, reuse, recycling, and composting.  Even with all of these collection processes, over half of the current material going to the landfill is degradable and a good source of biomass material.

Recology is fortunate to have these alternative fuels accessible to us through our collection, recycling, and compost facilities. We not only rely on our recycling efforts to divert and reuse materials, but we rely on the nature of biology to also help our goals of zero waste.

SF Environment created the City’s Zero Waste Plan from our overarching environmental principles that include:

  • Reusing materials at a level that is their next best and highest use
  • Avoiding high-temperature conversion (incineration)
  • Achieving the highest carbon footprint reduction possible
  • Employing local and biological processes that mimic nature

Currently, biological processes are used, managed, and exploited to stabilize thousands of tons of organic material a year through our compost programs.  It is consistent with Recology’s sustainability goals, and the City’s overarching principles, to further utilize natural processes to produce biodiesel from the City’s waste stream.

San Francisco Chinese New Year Festival and Parade

Posted in Community, Events, San Bruno, San Francisco, San Mateo County, Silicon Valley, South Bay by ErinAtRecology on January 31, 2014

Chinese New Year at Recology
Happy Lunar New Year – Gung Hay Fat Choy!

Join Recology in celebrating Chinese New Year at the San Francisco Chinese New Year Festival and Parade.

When: February 15, 5:15 pm – 8:00 pm
Location: Market and Second Street to Kearny and Jackson
For more information, visit www.chineseparade.com/route.asp

Recology Sunset Scavenger and Recology Golden Gate have been collecting recyclables and trash in San Francisco for well over 80 years. We’re excited to celebrate another year of service at the San Francisco Chinese New Year parade on Saturday, February 15th. Our Recology Drill Team and the Recology Dragon and Pearl will make an appearance at this years parade to welcome the Year of the Horse.

The Recology Dragon and Pearl, created by San Francisco artists Dana Albany and Flash Hopkins, is constructed out of 100% recycled materials. As a “tip-of-the-hat” to our history, the Recology Drill Team will be showing the crowd what they can do with a packing can. In the past, they carried these cans on their backs, house-to-house, up and down stairs, and into backyards collecting trash before carrying it back out to the street to dump into the truck. These folks have to be in shape, since each can weighs 40 pounds when empty!

Following the award-winning drill team, will be “Old Red,” an antique garbage truck built in 1948. While “Old Red” was state-of-the-art in the 1940s, today Recology’s entire fleet of modern collection vehicles are powered by clean, alternative fuels such as liquid natural gas and bio-diesel.

Last in line will be the “Green DeMartini,” an antique truck from 1954. This truck collected materials from the streets of San Francisco for over 30 years!

The Recology Family invites you to celebrate Lunar New Year with us! GUNG HAY FAT CHOY!

Parade route map:

paraderoute (more…)

Upcoming Artist in Residence Program Exhibition at Recology San Francisco

Posted in Community, Diversion, Events, San Francisco, You Should Know... by art at the dump on January 6, 2014

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Yulia Pinkusevich, Stephanie Syjuco, and student artist Brittany Watkins on Friday, January 24, from 5-9pm and Saturday, January 25, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, January 28, from 5-7pm. An artist panel discussion will follow at 7pm at 401 Tunnel Avenue. This exhibition will be the culmination of four months of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.


Yulia Pinkusevich: The Glory of a Tool is Seldom Judged by Its Handle

An important part of Yulia Pinkusevich’s practice involves the creation of large-scale monochromic paintings and drawings, often made directly on walls that engage with architecture and play with spatial perception. While at Recology she has continued this practice, but has also “drawn” with the duality of light and shadow, constructing projection boxes that contain objects that cast images on the walls of the studio’s back room. The results are visually complex cityscapes—large darkened outlines of high-rises and other familiar urban forms. While it is obvious this is a city, exactly what city this might be is less clear, as the architecture seems a cross between the futuristic and the familiar. It is no wonder that these forms are a bit enigmatic; they are created using capacitors and heat sinks pulled from common electronic devises—devices we interact with every day, but whose working components are far less familiar.

Pinkusevich examines the role of architecture in our daily lives and how it frames, transects, and obscures the world around us, affecting our spatial perception and cognitive understanding. Her use of components from computers and televisions—technologies that also shape our perception of the world—is an apt metaphor. Her work also addresses broader issues related to global urbanization and labor. The fabrication of electronics and other consumer goods increasingly has societal and environmental consequences when formerly rural areas become sites of rapidly built factories and worker housing. The long-term impact this instant architecture will have is only beginning to be understood. Pinkusevich’s working process also provided a more direct connection to labor. She discovered that there was a specific order to disassembling the electronics and realized that she was actually reversing the process of the people who put these components together. Other sculptural works speak to this more personal view of labor and tie what is built to the anonymous builders, people whose labor—whether used for the construction of an apartment block or a pair of jeans—is increasingly taken for granted along with the resources used to fuel our disposable lifestyles.

Born and raised in the Ukraine, Pinkusevich holds a BFA from Rutgers University and an MFA from Stanford University. She has been the recipient of a Headlands Center for the Arts Graduate Fellowship in Sausalito, a Cite Des Arts International Studio Residency in Paris, and a Helen Wurlitzer Foundation Residency Grant in Taos, New Mexico. She has exhibited primarily in San Francisco, New York and Santa Fe and her work is in the collection of Google, Inc. and the city of Albuquerque.


Stephanie Syjuco: Modern Ruins (Popular Cannibals)

For Modern Ruins (Popular Cannibals), Stephanie Syjuco takes beloved archetypes of modernist furniture and reproduces them dump-style to explore a range of ideas related to production, consumption, class, and economies. Continuing her investigation of copies and counterfeits, her George Nelson tables and Verner Panton lamps speak to how today’s reproductions are generations removed from their furniture forbearers. These iconic objects have been knocked-off or borrowed from so often that many people may think they originated at Ikea or Crate and Barrel. By exploring these forms, questions arise as to the original intent behind the designs and their meaning in today’s world where the clean lines of modern furniture often serve as signifiers of an affluent, idealized lifestyle.

Using what she describes as a “shanty-like” aesthetic, Syjuco’s reproductions are certainly not meant to fool anyone or be functional. Instead, they bring the sleek, modern ideal into collision with the scavenged and cobbled-together through the immediate use of materials in rudimentary constructions. The works speak to the shoddy materials and cheap labor used to produce affordable contemporary modern furniture, and like the remnants of a dying civilization, suggest societal and environmental collapse. Calling on her own memories of the Philippines where International Style buildings stood alongside slums and shanties, Syjuco’s work also references Modernism’s long and complicated relationship to developing countries—how decades ago these new urban spaces adapted and formed their own versions of Modernist architecture which in many cases are now dilapidated signs of the promise of utopian progress.

Syjuco is an assistant professor in Sculpture at the University of California at Berkeley. Her work is in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. She received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and has exhibited internationally including at venues in Paris, Manila, Berlin, and Bangkok. She is represented by Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco.

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Brittany Watkins: The Time Objects Tell
During her residency, Brittany Watkins has collected objects such as window blinds, wire and inner tubes, and has shredded, knotted, woven and bent them to create abstract sculptural works. By dramatically altering their forms, Watkins has liberated these common items from their intended uses and explores their hidden potential. Watkins’ repetitive and time-intensive working process provides intimacy with the materials, and the resulting sculptures speak to connections between the inanimate and the animate. Suggestive of natural or biological forms, her works may also prompt viewers to assign more personal, human qualities to these objects.

For her exhibition, Watkins will present a large-scale sculpture as the centerpiece of an installation that will include other smaller, related works. Designed to be entered, this central piece will enable viewers to step inside, be engulfed by the materials, and have the same sort of personal experience with them that the artist did when making the work. Those that enter will also be confronted with their own physicality within a space that itself references the body. The other small pieces that compose this sculptural ecosystem serve to illustrate the versatility and mutability of the materials. They are grounded, but also loop, drape, and expand out, adapting as required to unseen forces.

Watkins is a graduate student at the California College of the Arts. She received her BFA from Montana State University with an emphasis in sculpture. She has exhibited at the Center on Contemporary Art in Seattle, the International Sculpture Center Temporary Space in Chicago, and the IEI Austin Gallery in Texas. Her work was published in the October 2011 issue of International Sculpture.


About the Recology Artist in Residence Program

Since 1990, the Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco has encouraged the conservation of natural resources while instilling a greater appreciation for art and the environment in children and adults. This one-of-a-kind program enables artists to work in studio space on site for four months, use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, and speak to students and the general public about reuse and their residency experiences. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

When:
Reception- Friday, January 24, 2014, 5-9pm
Reception-Saturday, January 25, 2014, 1-3pm
Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 5-7pm
Artist panel discussion- Tuesday, January 28, 7pm

Where: Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible. http://www.recologysf.com/AIR

Tis the Season… for Recycling and Reuse!

Recology Holiday Recycling

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