Recology

Recycle Unwanted Clothing and Textiles in San Francisco

Posted in Diversion, Recycling, Resource Recovery, San Francisco, Waste Reduction, Waste Streams by ErinAtRecology on July 23, 2015

textiles
What do tote bags, oven mitts, chair cushions, carpet padding, and rugs have in common? They can all be made from recycled clothes and other textiles.

Many cities, including San Francisco, are making new efforts to collect old clothes and other textiles for recycling. Wearable items, recycled though a textile collection program, can be worn again. This ensures that the energy which once went into making the product is respected and optimally used. Post-consumer textiles that are threadbare, stained or torn can be made into other practical products, such as rags for commercial and residential use and insulation for automobiles and homes.

Why is it important to donate and recycle clothes and other textiles? Just like recycling bottles, cans, and paper and composting food scraps and plant cuttings, recycling textiles keeps materials out of landfills and incinerators.

The U.S. generates 25 billion pounds of textile waste per year; that’s about 82 pounds per resident. On average, each person donates or recycles 12 pounds of clothing discards but sends 70 pounds to landfills. It is within our power to change that for the better.

Increasingly, environmentally minded fashion designers use recycled textiles to create handbags, place mats, drink coasters, and coin purses. One enterprise remakes old work shirts into adorable dresses for little girls. Others invent stylish skirts, baby shoes, and fun neckties. At least one designer has turned white T-shirts into a wedding dress.

How can San Francisco residents add to these efforts? Please fold all old clothes and other textiles, put them in an open-top cardboard box, and schedule a special pickup with Recology. Send us an email through the “contact us” form on RecologySF.com or call (415) 330-1300.

These simple steps help San Francisco get closer to zero waste, an initiative set by our city to help protect the environment. In this way, recycling textiles — like reducing waste, practicing reuse, and participating in the blue and green bin program — is an opportunity to be part of the solution.

Make Art, Not Landfill: The 25th Anniversary of the Recology Artist in Residence Program

Posted in Events, Resource Recovery by ErinAtRecology on June 3, 2015

Location

Thoreau Center for Sustainability
Presidio Building 1014 (Lincoln Blvd. and Torney Ave.), San Francisco 94129

Date/Time

Exhibition: June 8-September 10, 2015
Reception: Thursday, June 11, 2015, 5-8pm
Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30am-5pm

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible. http://www.recologysf.com/AIR

JamilJamil Hellu, Cart 4, Balls (Blue),
2014.
chadChad Hasegawa, Bear,
2013.
amyAmy Wilson Faville, Carpet Mountain, 2012.
laurenLauren DiCioccio, Thank You Bag (White and Blue).

 


In celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Recology Artist in Residence Program, Recology and the Thoreau Center for Sustainability are hosting an exhibition and reception at the Thoreau Center’s galleries. The exhibition will run from June 8 to September 10 and will feature more than 50 artworks made from recycled materials by 43 artists during their residencies at “the dump.” An opening reception will be held on Thursday, June 11, from 5-8pm.

Since the Artist in Residence Program’s founding in 1990, more than 150 Bay Area artists have worked at Recology San Francisco, making art from things that people have thrown away. The program is the first of its kind in the country and was developed when curbside recycling was established in San Francisco. Conceived by artist and activist Jo Hanson, the program was the most innovative component of an education initiative that encouraged people to recycle. Now, twenty-five years later, the program has garnered international attention, and has grown to include an Environmental Learning Center, an extensive public tour program, a three-acre sculpture garden, and off-site exhibitions.

Thirty artists have completed residencies since 2010 when the program celebrated its twentieth anniversary. Work by these artists is included in the exhibition, along with pieces by several previous artists. Artwork represented includes painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, collage, sound art, and mixed-media. A video slide show documenting all former artists will also be presented in the exhibition.

The goal of the Artist in Residence Program is to support Bay Area artists while teaching the importance of reducing, reusing, and recycling. Artists work in a studio on-site at San Francisco’s Transfer Station and scavenge in the Public Disposal and Recycling Area for materials to make their art. The results of hyper-consumerism, easy disposability, planned obsolescence, and our general love of “stuff” are disturbingly plentiful. Not all artists necessarily make work that directly addresses these issues, but all residency participants do feel the impact of being so intimately exposed to the waste stream.

Recology is honored to partner with Tides and the Thoreau Center on this exhibition and celebration. The Tides-operated Thoreau Center is a 150,000 square foot nonprofit center located in the historic Presidio. Comprising 12 buildings, the environmentally and financially sustainable facility houses over 60 nonprofits that work for a healthy environment and a just world.

Recology is an employee-owned company that traces its roots back to Gold-Rush-era San Francisco. It provides collection, recycling, disposal, and composting and has over 40 subsidiaries, including Golden Gate Disposal and Sunset Scavenger. Recology is proud to serve more than 127 communities including 700,000 residential and 100,000 commercial customers in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington.

 

Recycling Economics: A Cost-Benefit Analysis

Posted in Diversion, Recology, Recycling, Resource Recovery, Waste Reduction by ErinAtRecology on April 28, 2015

Recology Recyclables
John Porter, Recology Guest Blogger

San Francisco Region Group Controller

Since I started at Recology a few years ago, one of the most common questions I receive surrounds both the environmental and economic impact of recycling. It’s usually in some form of: “How could the environmental and financial costs of sorting, shipping and processing of recyclables be favorable to simply sending the material to the landfill?”

The answer to this question is based on the cost and environmental impact of recycling facility operations – sorting recyclables and shipping the material for processing so they can be reintroduced to the market. From a cost perspective, can these efforts and the resources used be advantageous to sending the material to the landfill? Yes, both financially and environmentally.

That said there are two important considerations that must be included in the discussion:

The first is evaluating the difference between producing new products from recycled versus virgin material. Recycling aluminum, for example, can reduce energy consumption by as much as 95%. Savings for other materials are lower, but still substantial: about 70% for plastics, 60% for steel, 40% for paper, and 30% for glass. (1) In all cases, the energy savings are significant and well worth the effort to recover them.

The second are externalities, which are the un-priced, outside benefits that recycling produces. These include decreased air pollution from mills and factories, less water contamination from landfills, and reduced resource consumption. All of which have a financial and environmental cost. The process for obtaining and processing virgin materials is not often associated with recycling. We all know that mining, drilling and logging are activities that are detrimental to the environment, but since we aren’t paying for them on our monthly garbage bill, these factors are oftentimes overlooked.

When we really delve into the economics of recycling, it’s easier to understand if we look at the big picture.  The energy used to separate and process our recyclable material is offset by the amount of energy it would take to extract virgin materials and create new products. So, there is much more to consider than the cost we see on our garbage bills, and it also makes a lot of sense to think about our garbage as materials or commodities to be re-used in the future.

(1)” The truth about recycling“, The Economist, June 2007

California Passes Progressive Organics Recycling Bill

Posted in Composting, Diversion, Policy, Resource Recovery, Waste Reduction by ErinAtRecology on November 17, 2014

recology commercial compost
The last few months proved to be significant for California’s environmentalists and waste & recycling industry alike. In addition to signing SB 270, the nation’s first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags, Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 1826 (Chesbro), requiring commercial businesses to begin recycling organics.

According to Assembly Bill 1826, organics include “food waste, green waste, landscape and pruning waste, nonhazardous wood waste, and food-soiled paper waste that is mixed in with food waste.” By spring 2016, restaurants, grocery stores, and other commercial food and yard waste producers generating at least 8 cubic yards of organics per week will be required to separate their organics and properly send the materials to an organics processing facility.

Most notably, the move towards large-scale organics recycling will reduce the amount of food scraps and yard waste headed to landfills, and increase materials headed for anaerobic digestion and composting facilities. The influx of organic materials to processing facilities will be converted to renewable energy through anaerobic digestion, or composted for use on local farms.

By signing AB 1826…Governor Brown ensured that all of California shares in the environmental, agricultural, and economic benefits of organics recycling with reduced local emissions of greenhouse gases, new jobs and valuable compost for our farms and vineyards – Mike Sangiacomo, President & CEO, Recology

Assemblymember Wesley Chesbro adds, “Landfilled food and other organic materials produce methane, a major contributor to climate change,” Chesbro said. “Methane is a greenhouse gas that traps 21 times more heat than carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas created by the burning of fossil fuels.”

Rural areas, however, are exempt: “‘Rural jurisdiction’ means a jurisdiction that is located entirely within one or more rural counties, or a regional agency comprised of jurisdictions that are located within one or more rural counties…’Rural county’ means a county that has a total population of less than 70,000 persons.”

Commercial organics recycling is a step forward in terms of increasing the State’s diversion percentages and reducing landfill tonnages. The end goal, however, will always be to return resources and nutrients back to the environment where they originated. We think it will help accomplish all of these goals. 

Recology San Mateo County Offers Food for Thought

Posted in Community, Composting, Resource Recovery, San Mateo County by ErinAtRecology on September 10, 2014

Recology San Mateo County

We’ve seen how the “eat local” movement has gained a lot of attention recently.  Local farmers’ markets and family farms are plentiful in and around the Bay Area, yet many people may not understand what it means to eat locally, or why it’s even important.

Generally, local food is defined as food that has traveled less than 400 miles from producer to consumer. Less travel time means a significant reduction in transportation costs and environmental impact. Eating locally not only has a direct impact on reducing energy use and global climate change, but it supports local economies and has a positive impact on local communities.

A few interesting facts about food consumption in the United States:

Did you know…much of the food purchased in grocery stores today is often imported from other countries?

Did you know…the average American meal contains ingredients imported from five different countries?

Did you know…the transportation of our food translates to massive amounts of carbon dioxide emissions, a leading greenhouse gas and major contributor to climate change?

Did you know…the import of fruits, nuts, and vegetables in California by airplane resulted in 70,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions, which is the equivalent of 12,000 cars on the road?

Buying, fresh, healthy foods from local farmers, fisherman, and ranchers, helps support our local economy, reduces carbon emissions, and best of all – it tastes delicious! Below are some links to local resources that offer an abundance of fresh and natural foods.  Bon Appétit!

Below are a few resources for San Mateo County residents and businesses to purachse locally grown food:

http://www.pcfma.com/
http://www.freshasitgets.com/
http://www.localharvest.org
http://www.farmigo.com/

Recology San Mateo County Congratulates BizSMART Award Winners

Posted in Community, Recycling, Resource Recovery, San Mateo County, Waste Reduction, WASTE ZERO by ErinAtRecology on June 19, 2014

Recology BizSmartThe BizSMART @ Work is an annual award program recognizing businesses and multi-family complexes that are leading the way to reduce waste and conserve natural resources.

Recology San Mateo County (Recology) would like to congratulate this year’s BizSMART @ Work Award winners. Recology’s team thrives on working with the businesses and multi-family complexes to help them increase their diversion levels.

Recology works closely with customers by providing waste audits, cost savings analyses, internal recycling and compost containers, recycle buddy bags, posters, in addition to other outreach materials, and onsite trainings and presentations. With these tools, Recology’s Waste Zero Specialist can identify what technical assistance each customer needs to educate their staff and reduce waste going to the landfill.

Award categories include Recycle, Compost, and a combined Recycle and Compost.  The winners for this year’s awards are as follows:

Recycling Category:
Diddams Party Store, San Carlos
Sand Cove Apartments, Foster City

Composting Category:
300 Alpine Road LLC, West Bay Sanitary District
Bayshore Christian Ministries, East Palo Alto
Donato Enoteca, Redwood City
Milagros, Redwood City
Menlo Circus Club, Atherton
Oak Grove HOA/Manor, Menlo Park
Papillon Preschool, San Mateo
Promontory Point, Foster City

Recycling and Composting Category:
Abbott Vascular, Menlo Park
Back Yard Coffee Company, Redwood City
Catered Too, East Palo Alto
Embarcadero Capital Partners LLC, Belmont
Hassett Hardware, San Mateo
Impossible Foods, Inc., Redwood City
Kingston Café, San Mateo
The Plant Cafe, Burlingame
Rocket Fuel, Redwood City
Sweet Production, San Carlos
Villa Lucia’s Pizza, San Mateo County
The public also had a chance to select the 2014 Rethinker’s Choice Award by voting for their favorite nominees selected from the Recycle and Compost category winners through the RethinkWaste website. The winner of the 2014 Rethinkers’ Choice Award will be announced at the luncheon.

The nominees for the 2014 Rethinker’s Choice Award are:
Abbott Vascular, Redwood City
Back Yard Coffee Company, Redwood City
Embarcadero Capital Partners LLC, Belmont
Kingston Café, San Mateo
Sweet Production, San Carlos

Reducing Food Waste from the Source

Posted in Community, Composting, Diversion, Recology, Resource Recovery by ErinAtRecology on May 28, 2014

We first turned our attention to food waste in 1996 when Recology implemented a food scraps collection program in San Francisco. Still in use today, the green bin program ensures that organic material, such as food scraps and yard trimmings, do not end up in landfills. Many other Recology companies and cities have implemented similar programs, including San Mateo County and San Bruno. You can learn more about the affects of landfilling organics here: US Composting Council – Keeping Organics out of Landfills.

Although we think it’s important to recycle food scraps when possible, we think it’s just as important to consider ways to reduce food waste altogether.

Americans throw away 40% of their food, according to The National Resources Defense Council.

Recology OrganicsThe environmental impact of wasted food is fairly large. Imagine the amount of energy, oil, and water is used to produce and transport food across the United States, from farms to cities, and from cities to rural areas.

By preventing food from even entering a bin, we significantly reduce financial and environmental impacts. Here are a few small, but impactful tips for reducing your food waste.

  • Plan your meals, buy what you need – There’s a fine line between purchasing enough food and buying too much. Planning your meals for the week will help you stick to a plan, meaning you’re less likely to toss expired food.
  • Learn more about expiration dates – Foods that are edible after the marked expiration date is surprising. The use-by dates don’t always indicate spoiled food, but then again it’s good to know which foods are more sensitive to these dates than others.
  • Freeze unused food – Utilize your freezer. If you’re unable to finish the pot pie you made last night, freeze portions for quick lunches and dinners.
  • Take your lunch or share your leftovers– Using leftovers for meals at work is the best way to use excess food. Pack leftovers in your kids’ lunch, or share with coworkers, family, or friends if you know you’re not going to finish it.
  • Proper storageLearn how to store fruit and vegetables. It’s important to keep pre-cut and chopped produce in the refrigerator in sealed containers.

Recology Western Oregon Partners with Local Veteran to Restore and Donate Thousands of Bicycles in Yamhill County

Three years ago, Dean Williams, a retired Vietnam Veteran from Amity, OR, noticed a few perfectly good bikes on a pile of scrap metal at a nearby waste facility. At the time, his granddaughter’s bike was recently stolen, so he went in to ask about purchasing one.

Recology Western OregonFrom that day on, Dean has been dedicated to refurbishing and donating bikes to local schools, probation departments, the Yamhill County Action Partnership (YCAP), police departments, church groups, and other local community organizations. Many of the donated bikes are the primary mode of transportation for recipients, members of the community who do not have access to a vehicle use the bikes to commute to work or school.

By early 2014, Dean’s project had become so successful, he’d run into a problem: his home’s driveway was full of salvaged parts, and he needed more tools and resources to continue his project.

Recology Western Oregon (RWO) decided to help. Dean’s project embraces RWO’s mission to achieve “Waste Zero” by finding a new life for previously discarded materials. It also provides a sustainable form of transportation for local children and families in need.

To help Dean’s project grow, RWO established a new Bike Shop at the RWO Valley Recovery Zone in McMinnville, OR. Dean has been provided with tools, storage space, and access to discarded bike parts at the facility. Even the shop’s benches and tables carry a message of sustainability – Dean salvaged lumber from RWO wood piles to build the work benches.

The shop is also serves as an education center where members of the community can learn basic bike maintenance and repair. Dean and RWO hope to educate the public on the importance of reuse and recycle, ensuring fewer resources end up in the scrap pile.

Dean has repaired and donated over 1,600 bikes as of May 2014, and with the help of RWO, his mission continues to expand. A box of bikes is currently being prepared for shipment to Africa, and Dean also plans to expand his collection efforts to other Recology operations along the Oregon Coast and Washington State.

Dean’s story began as one person’s passion to turn trash into treasure; today, it’s become a model reuse and recycle program. If you’d like more information or would like to get involved in the project, please stop by the “Bike Shop” at RWO’s Valley Recovery Zone, or send an email to rwoinfo@recology.com.

RWOBikeShop

 

 

 

Help California Save Water – Compost

Posted in Community, Composting, Diversion, Recology, Resource Recovery, Waste Reduction, WASTE ZERO by ErinAtRecology on May 6, 2014

In honor of International Compost Awareness Week (May 5 – 11), an initiative created by the US Composting Council, we’re sharing our thoughts on this years focus: “Compost: The Solution to Sustainable Soil and Water.”

The traditional reasons to participate in a curbside compost program are to keep materials out of landfills and to return nutrients, in the form of compost, to local farms and vineyards. Those nutrients give farmers a viable alternative to using synthetic fertilizers and help farmers grow healthy food that comes back to the city to support our good health.

But there is a third great reason to compost: It helps California, our home state, save water – tremendous amounts of water.

Compost is 50 percent humus by weight. Humus is organic matter that helps soil retain moisture. Humus is a form of carbon; it both attracts and holds water. When we apply compost to an orchard, farm, or vineyard, we increase the amount of humus in the farm’s soil, and thereby increase the capacity of the soil to withstand drought conditions.

Recology CompostFarmers like to apply compost because doing so helps their soil and their crops get the full benefit of any rain or irrigation. This is particularly important for orchards, which require a lot of irrigation.

Here is a key statistic: If we increase organic matter by one percent on one acre of land by adding compost and by farming environmentally, we can save 16,500 gallons of water per year. Imagine how much water we could save if every city in California participated in a compost collection programs, sending a lot more compost to local farms.

Knowing that composting is a highly effective way to help California save water, many Recology employee-owners have an increased motive to participate in Recology’s green-bin programs. We are doing a good job of composting scraps and plant cuttings in many areas like San Francisco, but we can do much better. What can an individual do on a daily basis to help? Place all food scraps and plant cuttings in the green bin for curbside collection. Also, we can place all food-soiled paper, things like used paper napkins and towels, in the green bin (soiled paper has short fibers – microorganisms in compost like short paper fibers). Soiled paper in a kitchen compost pail or curbside compost bin will also absorb moisture, which will help control odor.

Recology set the trend when we started an urban compost collection program in San Francisco in 1996 to reduce landfill disposal and turn food scraps into compost. Now we can help our state save great amounts of water by extending our good green habit and composting all of our scraps, plant cuttings, and soiled paper.

Recology San Francisco Artist in Residence Exhibitions: Work by Matthew Gottschalk, Jamil Hellu and Claire Lynch

Posted in Community, Diversion, Events, Resource Recovery, San Francisco by art at the dump on May 2, 2014

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco will host an exhibition and reception for current artists-in-residence Matthew Gottschalk, Jamil Hellu, and student artist Claire Lynch on Friday, May 23, from 5-9pm and Saturday, May 24, from 1-3pm. Additional viewing hours will be held on Tuesday, May 27, from 5-7pm, followed by a gallery walk-through with the artists at 7pm. This exhibition will be the culmination of four months of work by the artists who have scavenged materials from the dump to make art and promote recycling and reuse.

Matthew Gottschalk: From the Belly of the Whale
Matthew Gottschalk has looked to explorers such as Jacques Cousteau and Carl Sagan for inspiration while on his own epic adventure at the dump. Gottschalk, who in the past has used marionette puppets as protagonists in installations that include sculpture and video components, has crafted a Carl Sagan puppet to explore the cosmos of the Recology facility. Through the use of touchstones of popular culture—and an ever-engaging marionette—Gottschalk brings playfulness to deeper questions of what it means to be human.

Work alludes to Joseph Campbell’s concepts of the “hero’s journey” and universal myths, as well as to the primal human need to bring order and meaning to the world around us through such stories. Gottschalk also references the dangers and mysteries of space and oceanographic exploration; his series of harpoons made from materials including baseball bats and fireplace pokers suggest conquest and being “in the belly of the whale”—both literally and metaphorically—connecting to his own process of hunting for materials in the Public Disposal and Recycling Area. Much like the real Carl Sagan’s “Golden Record,” a collection of audio recordings and photographs representing aspects of life on earth sent into space with the hope that it might one day be found, Gottschalk’s marionette Carl Sagan has collected the evidence of life on earth through its detritus so that we may better know ourselves. Gottschalk will also create a soundtrack for the journey played on revived and newly created musical instruments.

Gottschalk holds an MFA from Mills College, a BA in studio art from the University of California at Davis, and has studied at Yale. He was the recipient of a fellowship at Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany, and he has exhibited his artwork and videos in Nevada City, California; Stuttgart and Kassel, Germany; Gaza, Palestine; and Rijeka, Croatia.


Jamil Hellu: Portraits
The images photographer Jamil Hellu has made during his Recology residency explore a range of ideas related to identity and portraiture. Examining how we create and negotiate our identities throughout our lives, Hellu looks at our memories via objects, and contemplates the pivotal influences that shape who we are. The work questions the shifting nature of identity and the many roles we play in our personal and professional lives. In some cases, Hellu places the things he has photographed alongside their images and brings poignancy to mundane yet once cherished items. He also replicates scenes in found photographs that are simultaneously humorous and touching, pointing to commonalities between seemingly different people.

Work also explores identity in crisis and what it means to dispose of key markers of identity in a place like the public dump. If throwing away things, especially photographs, is a metaphor for the loss of individual identity, then the dump pile, becomes a homogenous monument to general human experience. Illustrating this is Hellu’s shredded pile of one-hundred snapshots of people at the Golden Gate Bridge—both a permanent erasure of these specific memories and an evocation of the universal significance this destination holds in people’s lives. Other photographs expand on this Bay Area and California love, as well as a love of photography itself.

Born in Brazil, Hellu received an MFA from Stanford University and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. He has been a recipient of a Graduate Student Fellowship from the Headlands Center for the Arts and received a residency at Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His recent series of photographs, Guardians of the Golden Gate, which capture friends in superhero guises of their own choosing in locations around the Bay Area, has been the subject of national media coverage.

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Claire Lynch: Befriending Demons
In a series of large-scale, abstract, sculptural bird forms, Claire Lynch explores difficult human emotions and how we negotiate and deal with these feelings. Of particular interest to Lynch are feelings such as tension, anger, or discomfort—emotions universally experienced, yet often condemned as socially unacceptable to express. Lynch explores the role these emotions have in shaping who we are, and how sometimes the things that are the most difficult to navigate provide space for the greatest growth. Four sculptures each address different responses to these emotions and represent concealment, routine, balance, and embrace. Together they point to the need to acknowledge and understand the place these feelings have in our lives.

Claire Lynch will receive her BA in studio art from Stanford University this June. She has taught art at the American Overseas School of Rome Summer Program in Italy, and at the Potomac School Summer Program in McLean, Virginia. While a student at Stanford, Lynch has worked as an assistant at the Stanford University Art Gallery, and as a fabricator.


About the Recology Artist in Residence Program

Since 1990, the Artist in Residence Program at Recology San Francisco has encouraged the conservation of natural resources while instilling a greater appreciation for art and the environment in children and adults. This one-of-a-kind program enables artists to work in studio space on site for four months, use materials recovered from the Public Disposal and Recycling Area, and speak to students and the general public about reuse and their residency experiences. Over one-hundred professional Bay Area artists have completed residencies. Applications are accepted annually in August.

When:
Reception- Friday, May 23, 2014, 5-9pm
Reception-Saturday, May 24, 2014, 1-3pm
Additional viewing hours-Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 5-7pm with gallery walk-through with artists at 7pm

Where:
Art Studio located at 503 Tunnel Ave. and Environmental Learning Center Gallery at 401 Tunnel Ave., San Francisco, CA

Admission is free and open to the public, all ages welcome, wheelchair accessible. http://www.recologysf.com/AIR

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