Art at the Dump Newsletter

It’s been a busy summer for the Recology San Francisco Artist in Residence Program. We’ve been involved with the establishment of a new art program in Portland, Oregon, have installed several off-site exhibitions, and processed the close to one-hundred applications we received for the next residency cycle. Perhaps you saw us on the SF Art Commission’s Culture Wire Program while flying on Virgin America, or walking the Pride Parade route dressed as a slice of pizza, encouraging you to compost? Whatever the summer held for you, we hope it was enjoyable. Fall means school tours for us, so we are back in the thick of it, teaching San Francisco’s 3rd–6th graders how to recycle and reuse, introducing them to the artists, and showing them “the stinkiest building in the world!” (The garbage transfer station.)

New Resident Artists

New artists Donna Anderson Kam and Terry Berlier began their residencies October 1. Donna has been diligently collecting pastels, crayons, and any big piece of paper that comes through the dump to create her large-scale drawings that present scenes taken from news headlines. Terry, who just returned from Washington DC where an exhibition featuring her work was profiled in a BBC article (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-15314287), has begun gathering materials for her kinetic sculptures. We are also happy to welcome new student artist Ethan Estess. Ethan is a graduate student at Stanford University in an interdisciplinary environmental science program where he studies science communication, mechanical engineering, and studio art. Mark your calendars for their end of residency exhibition on January 20 and 21.

Pacific Northwest Art Program (PNAP)


On September 15 and 16 over 400 people attended the first exhibition of work from Recology Portland’s new art program at the city’s Metro Regional Center. The Pacific Northwest Art Program (PNAP) is a collaborative project developed by Recology; Cracked Pots, Inc., an environmental arts organization; and Metro, the regional government for the Portland metropolitan area. Ben Dye, Jen Fuller, William Rihel, Mike Suri, and Leslie Vigeant were the artists selected for the first year of the program, which has as its goal the promotion of new ways of thinking about resource conservation, art, and the environment. View artwork they produced during their residencies here.

2012 Applicants

We are currently reviewing applications for our 2012 residency cycle. Our board will select candidates for interviews and chooses residency recipients in November, so look for our announcement of new resident artists in December.

Recycled Tote Bags

Recology has put old uniforms to good use by turning them into tote bags. The bags were designed by Debi Fong at UPsicle and made locally in collaboration with SFMade. Each bag costs $40 (including tax) and can be purchased through us. They feature the name of the employee who wore the uniform, and are pretty darn stylish!

Off-Site Exhibitions


We are sad to say goodbye to artists Lauren DiCioccio, Abel Rodriguez, and Kaiya Rainbolt who completed their residencies at the end of September and made the most of their four months, producing incredible work and bringing some super positive energy to the facility. If you weren’t able to attend their exhibition, it has been re-installed in the windows at 1045 Mission Street in the SOMA Residences building and will be up through the holidays. Don’t miss this second chance to see their work.

We were invited by WEAD (Women Environmental Artists Directory) to present an exhibition of “Art from the Dump” at the annual Bioneers Conference at the Marin Center from October 14-16. The conference, whose attendees come from around the world, featured a range of speakers (including Gloria Steinem and Phillipe Cousteau) and events that focus on global environmental issues.

Don’t miss our rotating exhibitions in the Chronicle Building Café sponsored by Intersection for the Arts, open 7am to 5pm at 100 5th Street.


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